The prior clamping of the set-screws tends to have pressed a dimple into the hollow shaft and to have distorted the shaft's roundness into an eccentric shape. While releasing the set-screws, I was careful to loosen them enough to let the cone swing around any such distortions. I was also careful to observe any binding of the old cones on the eccentricity or burring on the shaft. The fit of the cone on the shaft is supposed to be loose enough to avoid binding, but if it were to occur one would have to be careful not to assume the spring was unwound when in fact the cone was just stuck on the shaft. If I had a stuck cone that I could not unwind with a little extra force, then I would have called in a technician to deal with it. In the worst case, I suppose the spring must be deliberately broken with some hazard, thus releasing it for a forceful disassembly, and the shaft and some other parts replaced. But this is an unlikely situation and in this case was not necessary.
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Cycle lifetime unchanged by diameter-versus-length tradeoffs: Since the material stress (and thus cycle lifetime) for equal torques varies only with d, and not D or N, trading coil diameter (D) for spring length (N) in this fashion has no effect on cycle lifetime. Long and skinny, versus shorter and fatter, they'll wear the same if they have the same wire size and diameter-length product. The game of life is all about wire size when it comes to springs (see below).
Screw-drive garage door openers are another type of direct-drive garage door opener. The screw-drive's relatively simple mechanism, which moves up and down a threaded steel rod, makes for a powerful, low-maintenance garage door opener. They are quieter than chain-drive openers, and are fast workers, but, like direct-drive openers, they tend to be pricey.

The Certified Technician, Rey Lopez, was competent, professional, polite, and willing to work. He quickly removed the old door and installed the new one. He then explained the vast differences between what we originally had and what we'd just purchased (stronger spring/tension rates; increased viability of door opening/closing life; beefier hardware; plastic vs. nylon rollers; stronger door reinforcement). Ray performed with alacrity his tasks and then demonstrated the quiet, solid way the door retracted--no banging after the initial rise from the ground. Finally, his attention to detail was so precise that he enabled another remote controlling all three doors, plus he capped some frayed wires, thus solving the problem of why the door opened intermittently. I would rate him a "6" on a scale of "1-5", meaning he went above and beyond our expectations. His "can do" attitude, coupled with the deference he showed, will take him a long, long way. May HaShem richly bless him in his endeavors!read more


Your ad had no cheap coupons or promises.. Just business. Service was more than prompt. No attempt to fix something that was not broke or did not try to sell me anything I did not need. He stated the price at the beginning and stuck to it. (I was so pleased, I did not bother to mention a senior discount.) Very, very pleased that I have found someone I can trust and rely on. GaryRichard

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