The Keychain Garage Door Remote offers portable control The Keychain Garage Door Remote offers portable control with the highest level of security. Featuring a three-button design this compact remote controls up to three garage door openers individually. Easily programmed and compatible with nearly every garage door opener made by Chamberlain LiftMaster and Craftsman it’s the easy option for ...  More + Product Details Close

The standard winding tools are simply a pair of 18-inch lengths of mild steel rod, 1/2-inch diameter. Winding cones can have different socket sizes (such as 5/8 inch instead of 1/2 inch), so it is important to measure the socket and select a matching rod diameter. Also beware that poor-quality cones may have a sloppy fit to the winding bars, and a loose fit presents a severe hazard of slipping at the worst moment; anything more than about an inch or two of play at the handle end is too loose for safety. I bought a 3-foot length of zinc-plated 1/2-inch diameter steel rod from Home Depot for about $3, which conveniently cuts into two halves of just the right length (the store might even cut it for you if you ask). A steel supplier selling at commodity prices might charge about 50 cents or so for such a piece that weighs about 2 lbs. Drill rod would work if used in the annealed condition in which it is originally sold, but the added expense provides no benefit and the brittleness (if it had been hardened and not annealed) would worry me a bit. Rebar, threaded rod, screwdrivers, etc., are absolutely foolish as they will not fit the socket snugly. Aluminum rod is definitely too weak, and will bend under the torque that must be applied. Longer rods would make for more leverage but unwieldly swing; shorter rods make for uncontrollable swing. As we'll calculate below, the 18-inch standard tool length is an appropriate compromise. Note that you do not need 18 inches of ceiling clearance above the torsion shaft to use an 18-inch rod, since you need not swing the rods above horizontal when winding.
Here's a view of my door and its broken torsion spring. This door is 10 feet wide and 7 feet high, constructed of 3/4 thick hollow wood panels inside with 3/4 inch plywood siding outside to match the house exterior. This is original to the house which was constructed in 1978, and is much heavier (238 pounds, as I measured later as described below) than the steel doors most common today in new construction. The 10-foot width is a little larger than usual for a one-car garage; such doors are typically only 7 or 9 feet wide. The ceiling height is 9 feet, providing 18 inches clearance above the torsion shaft. This is in a 3-car garage with 3 separate extra-wide doors. Every man's dream! ('cept when the door is broke.)

Roberto was very courteous and explained the details of what he was doing. He also pointed out a repair I might consider having done (replacement of the bottom panel of my door) and asked the office to follow up with me on this. Someone did follow up with me and since replacement of the bottom panel is not an option and I would have to replace the door, I decided that I can wait.
Critical measurements: Torsion springs come a variety of standardized sizes, so you have to carefully measure the old springs to know what to order for proper replacements. Tables of standard sizes and designs are on the Web, such as here [www.industrialspring.com]. The four critical measurements (all in inches) are: (1) the wire thickness (which I'm measuring here with a dial caliper; you can also measure the length of a number of closely stacked turns with a ruler and divide by the number of turns in the stack, measuring 10 turns this way makes the math easy), (2) the inside diameter (not outside!) of the relaxed (not wound!) coil, (3) the overall length of the relaxed (not wound!) spring coils, not including the winding cones, and (4) the right- or left-hand winding of the spring. One must glibly quote those figures to the spring supplier, otherwise one's lack of expertise will be obvious, and one will not be worthy of buying the parts.
Go for the look of wood with less upkeep with low-maintenance faux wood composite & steel garage doors from our Canyon Ridge® & Coachman® Collections. Our Gallery, and Classic Collection garage doors are also available with Ultra-Grain®, a wood look durable paint. If you’re looking for a more traditional look, our Classic™ Collection of steel raised panel and flush panel garage doors complement most home styles. Add one of our many decorative window options to customize the door's appearance and let natural light into your garage.

We believe that we are only as good as the technicians we send to your home. As the face of our company, our techs must be well trained, professional, and dependable. This is why we personally hire each one of our technicians and provide them with innovative training, full field experience, and certification before they ever take a call. Our state of the art training facility houses every type of garage door and they become experienced working on every type of opener. You can be confident when you choose Precision Door that the work we do for you will be completed properly, efficiently, and on time.
Regardless of the material, you will likely need to perform some regular maintenance tasks. A garage door professional can examine common problem areas to ensure all are working as they should. Additionally, it is necessary to examine the integrity of the door itself, since your garage can be especially vulnerable to security issues if your door is not structurally sound.
Clopay® is proud to be the largest manufacturer of residential garage doors in North America and recognized as the leading brand among homeowners. For more than 50 years, we have helped homeowners reimagine their homes and create a personalized exterior that they can enjoy and take pride in for years to come. Clopay’s residential garage doors are designed and manufactured in the USA, starting at our headquarters in the heart of Ohio, and delivered to dealers via our 50 distribution centers throughout the US and Canada.

Carter door: Garage doors in Florida come with extra bracing on the back and are wind-loaded to protect against hurricanes. The average with is 350 lbs. but some can weigh as much as 800 lbs. It can cost up to $1,000 dollars to replace a steel two-car garage door and if it's made of wood it can cost you up to $5,000 dollars. Some customized doors can be as much as 20 - 30k.


Most garage door openers include a remote that lets you open and close the door from the comfort and safety of your car. Some garage door openers support Internet connectivity, either as an add-on or built in. This allows you to use an app that lets you open or close the garage door from your smartphone or tablet, and monitor your garage door's status (open or closed) from anywhere that you can connect to the net.

If your door has two springs, most professionals and research online says that replacing both springs is the best option. Most torsion springs are rated for 10,000 close/open cycles. If only one of your springs is broken, both springs are still recommended to be replaced. Considering that your second spring will break soon anyways, this added on fix is only going to cost you about $50 extra to assure that you don't have to pay another service fee for a second visit.
When a garage door goes off the track, the spring breaks, the door is dented or the garage door opener is on the fritz, a professional garage door repair specialist can help. The cost to have a garage door fixed varies, but the national average cost of garage door repair is $70-$110. The extent of the damage and the size and material of the door will affect the final cost. A garage door repair company generally charges a national average of $80 for a service call, which includes the first hour of labor and service, such as testing and inspecting the garage door and opener. Apart from labor, the garage door repair costs hinge on buying replacements parts. For example, a new spring costs an average of $60. Expect to pay several hundred dollars, though, if the door is beyond repair; a new garage door ranges in price from $200 to $4,000, and most homeowners spend an average of $800-$1,200.
If your garage door is opening slowly or making a lot of noise, the problem may not be your opener. So before you buy a new one, check for broken or wobbly rollers and brackets. But don’t replace the bottom roller bracket yourself—the cable attached to it is under extreme tension. You’ll need to call a pro. If you’re replacing the rollers, get nylon rollers. They operate quieter than steel rollers and cost only a few bucks more. Next, check the torsion spring (mounted on the header above the door opening) to see if it’s broken. When one breaks, you’ll see a gap in the coils. You’ll need a pro to replace a broken spring.

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