The usually recommended rule for a door being properly balanced is that it should lift "easily" through all its travel. The door may also remain stationary if let go somewhere around the middle of the travel, but a smoothly rolling door many not show this behavior (while a sticky track will!), so easy travel is the only reliable test for proper balance. A difficult door may be due to stiff bearings or rollers in the mechanism, tracks out of alignment, etc., not necessarily the torsion spring adjustment.
As we’ve mentioned before, springs are installed within your garage lift mechanism in order to help lift the door. Because doors are so heavy, the lift motor would undergo far more significant wear and tear if it had to lift the full weight of the door every time you opened it. Furthermore, in order to ensure that you can open your door even if you lose power in your home, springs allow you to lift the door by hand when the motor is disengaged.

Your garage door is most likely the largest opening on your home, and as a result, it can affect your home’s energy efficiency. For homes in areas that experience colder winters or warmer summers, choosing an insulated door can save you money and improve the comfort of your home. Doors insulated with our Intellicore® insulation technology operate more quietly and are more durable. We also offer insulated glass window options that can help maintain energy efficiency and allow natural light into your garage. Visit our insulation guide to learn more about garage door insulation, or learn more about Intellicore® here.
Before setting the last panel in the tracks, set the power unit on the actual frame and slide it in the ends. Hardened screws are used to attach the center bracket (Image 1). They are a different type screw — they are tougher and will last a lot longer. Make sure the bracket is level (to the eye) when installed and leave the bracket a little loose so adjustments can be made. Fasten down all the hinges (Image 2).
The torsion shaft with lift drums on the ends is above the door. The standard residential door shaft is a 1-inch outside diameter hollow steel tube. The inside diameters of the bearings, drums, and winding cones are sized to loosely fit that 1-inch diameter shaft. At the center is a bearing plate, on either side of which are the torsion springs, or in some cases just one larger spring. The spring pictured on the left in the photo is broken about 1/4 of the way in from its left end. The black shaft with dangling rope and door bracket is the track for the electric opener.
A spring design manual, also called a rate book, gives tables that relate the torque constant ("rate") and maximum turns for springs of given wire size, diameter, and length. For example, a typical page in a rate book would show a table for a given wire size and inside diameter, the maximum inch-pounds (MIP) of torque available for a standard lifetime of 10,000 cycles in that size, the weight of the spring per linear inch, and the rates of the spring (as IPPT, inch-pounds per turn) for each of various lengths. From these figures one can calculate the lifting capacity, substitutions, conversions, and cycle life upgrades for a door of given weight and drum geometry. The weight-lifting capacity of a given spring is calculated based on its torque constant (IPPT, or inch-pounds per turn), which is the rotational version of the spring constant that characterizes the spring. The IPPT constant is found from tables giving IPPT for given spring dimensions (wire-size/diameter/length). The same tables may indicate the maximum number of turns for various expected lifetimes in cycles. The torque required to balance a given door can be calculated from the weight of the door times the moment arm of the drums (as we do below under "Calculating the Forces We Will Be Handling"). The ultimate torque of the spring in the fully-wound condition is the number of turns (when fully-wound) times the IPPT constant. Choosing a spring to balance the door then simply requires matching the ultimate torque of the spring to the balancing torque.
GUESS YOU DON’T CARE to reply to my emails, so I'm posting it up here..... On Sep 8, 2018, at 2:52 PM, Joe Turiczek wrote: Thanks for the invoice, thanks for the service, thanks for the rapid response, thanks for Chris (the tech), but one note….. I’m a really handy guy, I repair and maintain nearly everything around the house, I am very mechanically adept, and I am also a highly skilled technical person that runs my own business by trade. I would have and could have repaired the belt myself, but I am traveling for business sooner than I could have ordered a belt, and did the repair….which means, I looked at the belts, I watched all the videos, it’s an EASY repair. I have belts down to a science, I’m really not an armchair DIY repair guy, I’m pretty good……That being said, I also shopped for prices of new belts for at least 30 mins or better, across easily 20-30 different parts and/or repair websites. Why am I telling you this? Because I think Chris, and your labor prices are spot on, and he deserved every cent, and your labor billing is more than fair…..however, I think your charge for the belt is a bunch of crap, it is nearly double of the HIGHEST price I found, which was $20-$25 higher than the average prices I found. Based on that alone, there is no way I could recommend, your otherwise FANTASTIC service, to anybody I know with a straight face. That’s just me being honest, because that’s who I am.

The special-price don't-tell-my-boss trick: In this scheme, after the technician has worked on your door for a bit, he will grimly notify you that he has discovered an additional repair needed, not just the spring(s). He will offer to do the work at a "special price" if you agree not to tell his boss. This air of conspiracy to get a bargain distracts and disarms you from critically thinking whether you really needed the repair in the first place (likely you don't), and whether the price is really a bargain (likely it isn't).
Fortunately, owners aren't bashful about weighing in on their garage door openers. Though some models get only a handful of reviews others receive hundreds of unique ratings on sites such as Amazon, Home Depot and Lowe's. If you are interested in a Craftsman garage door opener, Sears is the place to visit. While our research reveals that no garage door opener is perfect, several models jump to the fore as offering good performance and good value in the eyes of owners. These are the openers that we've named Best Reviewed for this edition of our report.
Our garage door installation and repair professionals are courteous, knowledgeable, skilled and dedicated to your satisfaction. Let us show you what we’ve done for so many businesses and homes throughout Cincinnati and northern Kentucky when it comes to their garage doors, and what we can do for you. Once you’ve tried our services, you won’t have to search for a garage door service provider in this area ever again.

Spring rate, torque, and lift: The spring rate K for these measurements is π*28.5*10^6 * (0.273)^4 / (32 * 140 * 1.72) = 64.5 IPPT. Applying 7.5 turns on this rate will yield a torque of 7.5 * 64.5 = 484 in-lb, which on the 4-inch drums (2-inch radius) yields a lift of (484 in*lbs)/(2 in) = 242 lbs. Again we find good agreement with the approximate door weight of 238 lbs.
Since their invention in the 1920s, electric garage door openers have come a long way. Garage door openers work by using a trolley connected to an arm that attaches to the top of the garage door and slides back and forth on a track, which opens and closes the garage door. When operating the motor, a chain or belt turns and pulls the trolley along the track. A good garage door opener will have a horsepower of 1/2 HP, 3/4 HP, or 1-1/4 HP. Garage door openers have the ability to open and close a limited number of times in power outage emergencies. Security is something else to consider when purchasing an opener. It's helpful to have sensors that will stop the operation of the garage door when a person, vehicle, or other obstacle is in the way.
Once the shaft, springs, and center bearing plate come down and lay on the floor, the old springs should be easy to get off and new ones slid on and assembled. Two bolts hold the center cones to the center bearing plate. The bearing on the center plate can be oiled while it is exposed from having the springs off. At this point it is a relief to be working with inert parts while standing on the floor rather than energized parts while up on the ladder. You might think it would save a little time to replace the spring with the shaft left up on the wall, but I found it was easier and safer to lower the works down to the garage floor first.

I repeat my caution about the uncertainty of interpreting color codes. A professional installer reading this page emailed me to say that the red color indicates the springs are right-hand windings, not the DASMA color code for the wire size. But this photo shows both a right- and a left-hand spring, and both have the red paint on the cones and set-screws. I conclude it is prudent to make your own measurements and analysis. Do not rely on the colors on old installations. The only time I would respect them would be on new parts that carried documentation giving the code.


Location, climate and building codes are just a few factors to consider when determining which type of garage door is right for your home. Depending on the region you live in, you may need to choose a wind load option for your garage door. Wind loaded garage doors help safeguard your home in high wind prone areas. With garage doors serving as the largest and often times the primary entrance to the home, an insulated garage door may also be right for you.
Ryan, the tech that did the initial inspection and Kyle, the tech that did the installation were both extremely skilled, knowledgeable, and have excellent customer service. They arrived on time as scheduled. Explained well what needs to be done and did the job well. We’re very pleased and recommend Castle Garage Doors. We’re giving Ryan, Kyle 10 🌟 along with Hollie for having excellent customer service in making sure the whole process ran smoothly. Thank you 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 -Grandpa & Grandma Read less
Go for the look of wood with less upkeep with low-maintenance faux wood composite & steel garage doors from our Canyon Ridge® & Coachman® Collections. Our Gallery, and Classic Collection garage doors are also available with Ultra-Grain®, a wood look durable paint. If you’re looking for a more traditional look, our Classic™ Collection of steel raised panel and flush panel garage doors complement most home styles. Add one of our many decorative window options to customize the door's appearance and let natural light into your garage.
Right-hand versus left-hand winding: Springs are chiral, that is, wound or "laid" in either a left- or right-hand orientation. This is a critical property of their design and specification; you cannot substitute a left for a right or vice versa. If you were to grasp the spring in your hand, and if your right hand orients the tips of your fingers like the ends of the coiled wire when your thumb points "out" of the core of the spring, then you have a right-hand spring; likewise left (which end you grasp does not matter). (This also happens to match the "right hand rule" of magnetic polarity, if you happen to be knowledgeable in such esoteric subjects.) Another way to identify the winding is to examine the spring vertically in front of you; if the coils facing you rise going to the right, it is right-hand (thus you can remember, "rise to the right is right-hand"), and likewise left indicates left-hand. Another way is to view the coil axially; a right-hand spring winds in a clockwise direction as it recedes away, and a left-hand spring counter-clockwise. Yet another way, not so easy to remember, is to hold the spring vertically and compare the coil shape to the letter "Z" (indicates right-hand lay) or the letter "S" (indicates left-hand lay).
And for some extra features, you'll appreciate accessing the system through the MyQ smartphone app. You can set up this Chamberlain opener to automatically close the door after 1, 5, or 10 minutes, which is great for people who are a bit forgetful. We also really like the motion-detecting control panel, which turns on lights whenever it records nearby movement.

Garage Door Repair

×