Even if one could somehow stretch and clamp the springs to the proper extra length, the process would still be more trouble, and there would be little or no reduction of risk. Lifting the full weight of the unsprung door by hand and clamping it in the raised position is dangerous in itself, and creates the same amount of stored energy as winding the springs, ready to slip out of your hands. Many doors won't travel far enough up the track to provide clearance to access the springs. You're also going to have to deal with winding stiff steel cables onto both lift drums at once without any resistance to maintain tension. Finally, even if you managed to complete the installation with the door raised, you then have to lower the massive door against an untested balancing torque. If you've made a mistake, then that massive door has nothing but your skeletal force applied through your meat clamps (hands) to prevent it from falling down and crushing whatever is in the way (perhaps your feet?).

Wood - Wood garage doors are sturdy and quite beautiful. However, if you live in a humid climate, your doors will be prone to rotting and splitting. If your wood is painted, you must also factor in the costs of painting as part of your regular maintenance routine. The cost of repairing the wood varies depending on the type. However, average cost to repair a wood panel is $190 to $215.
A typical version of an overhead garage door used in the past would have been built as a one-piece panel.[1] The panel was mounted on each side with unequal parallelogram style hinge lifting mechanism. Newer versions of overhead garage doors are now generally built from several panels hinged together that roll along a system of tracks guided by rollers.[1] The weight of the door may be 400 lb (181.4 kg) or more, but is balanced by either a torsion spring system or a pair of extension springs.[2] A remote controlled motorized mechanism for opening garage doors adds convenience, safety, and security.[3]
Even if one could somehow stretch and clamp the springs to the proper extra length, the process would still be more trouble, and there would be little or no reduction of risk. Lifting the full weight of the unsprung door by hand and clamping it in the raised position is dangerous in itself, and creates the same amount of stored energy as winding the springs, ready to slip out of your hands. Many doors won't travel far enough up the track to provide clearance to access the springs. You're also going to have to deal with winding stiff steel cables onto both lift drums at once without any resistance to maintain tension. Finally, even if you managed to complete the installation with the door raised, you then have to lower the massive door against an untested balancing torque. If you've made a mistake, then that massive door has nothing but your skeletal force applied through your meat clamps (hands) to prevent it from falling down and crushing whatever is in the way (perhaps your feet?).
The low rating on the CS is due to the fact that inwas out of town and my wife called because the garage door wouldn't open. We had repairs to the only other exit, and the CS said because it could be opened manually, it was no emergency. She was stuck in the house for over Sixteen hours. No emergency crew came out. Steve, a tech who came out the first time, fixed the door. It is not his fault CS took their sweet time to help a 45 year customer. I commend Steve. I do NOT have anything good to say about CS.
Screw-drive garage door openers aren't as popular as some other types, but feedback indicates that those that give the Genie Excelerator a try are largely very happy that they did. It's a fast performer, owners say, and the company claims that it can move a door at a rate of up to a foot per second. It's relatively quiet, too -- perhaps not the absolute quietest that you can buy, but certainly quieter than a chain-drive opener, and quieter than older screw-drive openers, users report.
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.
We only hire and train very experienced technicians, so you can be confident that you will get the best garage door service available. We strive for 100% customer satisfaction on all our work and stand behind our garage door service if you have any issue whatsoever. Our reviews tell of our dedication to excellence and offering the ABSOLUTE best quality products and customer experience. You can check out what our customers have to say about their experience to the Better Business Bureau by clicking here! We guarantee to be the overall top choice in the market for all your garage door needs. We are a family owned garage door company from the Central Kentucky area and only hire technicians that put forth the same honest values that we have. We strive for 100% customer satisfaction and if for any reason that you are unhappy with a technician or their service, we will be happy to make the experience right as we pride ourselves and our company on the highest of customer satisfaction and experience while offering the lowest prices in the market. We are top rated with all service rating and reviewing companies such as BBB, Home Advisor, Demandforce, and Angie’s List. We take our customers experince serious and we guarantee it!
Remember, not all garage door springs are alike. They are not one size fits all. If yours breaks, make a note of the brand and color code on the spring you need to replace. We'll get you the garage door opener parts you need, from seal kits to torsion and extension spring kits. Save money by replacing garage door hardware instead of replacing the whole unit.
Repair Sagging Garage Doors – As doors and homes age, they can shift and move and sometimes this results in a garage door that needs to be realigned or reinforced. We will send a technician to your home to adjust the doors and to inspect the entire opening to make sure the door isn’t damaged. Once we understand the problem, we will fix the needed parts and make any adjustments to the door.
It’s important to pick a door that suits the style of your house. If you live in a Craftsman bungalow, for example, you might want something that looks like the swing-out doors found on garages behind early Craftsman houses. Manufacturers of modern roll-up doors make them in styles that mimic the old swing doors, complete with faux strap hinges on the sides and a pair of handles flanking a deep groove in the center. 
We offer wide range of stainless metal appliqués. Brushed metal effect or painted any RAL colour. Appliqués will suit most demanding design requirements. If you can’t find what you like an option could be your personal design appliqué. Just send a picture or drawing and we will replicate it on your door. Use our recommended designs or create your own:
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.
Depending on the design, you can know in advance how many turns are going to have to be unwound. Lifting a 7-foot door by winding a cable on a 4-inch diameter (about 1 foot circumference) drum requires about 7 turns, plus one extra turn to maintain cable tension at the top-of-travel. Maintaining tension at the top-of-travel is critical; without it the cable will jump off the drum, requiring a serious repair.
Make sure the door is balanced. Close the door and pull the emergency release cord (always close the door first so it can’t come crashing down!). Lift the door about halfway up and let go. The door shouldn’t move. If it slides up or down, the torsion spring needs to be adjusted (or maybe even replaced). Adjusting the torsion spring is dangerous, so don’t attempt it yourself (you could get seriously hurt). Call a pro to adjust it.
All measurements should be in feet and inches. Step 1, measure across the existing door or desired space for the width, then up and down for the height. The rough opening of your space should be the same size as the door. Step 2, measure the sideroom, which is the space beside your door. Measure the width of the left side, and then the width of the right side. Step 3, measure the space above the door, which is called the headroom. Measure the height of the distance between the top of the door opening and the ceiling. Step 4, measure the ceiling, which is called the backroom. You’ll need to measure the distance of the garage door opening toward the back wall of your garage. You should have 6 total measurements in all once you’ve finished measuring the space. Keep in mind that having an automatic garage door opener installed might call for additional backroom or ceiling space.
Sectional: Also known as a raised panel door, this door is the most common. It is made of several horizontal panels hinged together, fitted with wheels and mounted within a track. The biggest advantage of this door is it takes up relatively little space and easily controlled with a standard remote garage door opener for a nominal cost. Their moving parts are readily accessible which can keep repair costs low. The average cost for sectional door repairs is $128.

Unmatched or mismatched spring pair: You may find that you have a pair of springs that are different sizes. This mismatch may be a normal application, since the total torque on the torsion shaft is simply the sum of the torque contribution of each spring (indeed, very large doors can be lifted with 4 or more springs along the torsion shaft). The sum of the torque rates determine the lift; and dividing the torque among multiple springs does not change this. Some repair shops even apply mismatched pairs deliberately, since a few stock sizes of springs can be combined to fit a wider range of door weights than only matched pairs. For example, a technician may carry springs in increments of 20 lbs of lift, and when using pairs this allows a 20 lb increment in possible choices instead of 40 lb increments. Or, one spring from a pair may have broken and been replaced with a spring of equal torque rate but different size than the original.
Today's garage doors come with those door sensors, and if anything is in the path of the door the sensor detects it and raises the door back to the open position. These precautions are important for families with young children or pets. Even if you don't have a mini me or furry friend running around your yard, it's a good idea to have a garage door that is safe for you, your guests and your belongings. 
The Chain Drive Rail Extension Kit for 10'-High The Chain Drive Rail Extension Kit for 10'-High Garage Doors is required for reliable everyday operation of Chamberlain chain drive models in 10-ft. garage door applications. Featuring a quick-install extension rail and replacement chain the kit includes everything needed for quick and easy installation. Includes one-year warranty rail extension replacement ...  More + Product Details Close
Michael Davis replaced the tension springs and just about everything else that moves on both of my single car garage doors. I think I paid a premium price ($900) but I also believe I got the quality of service I paid for. Both doors are balanced and glide effortlessly and quietly along the tracks. Michael took the time to inspect and adjust every aspect of the garage door system including the opener (which I installed myself).read more

I obtained my parts, as described on this page, from American Garage Door Supply Inc. (http://www.americandoorsupply.com/) They may have raised their small-order prices or imposed a minimum order since I ordered from them in 2002 at the prices in my essay above. The Web site offers a free catalog by PDF download or mail. Springs in 2005 were priced at $2.25/lb.


In the United States, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 1990 required that automatic residential garage door operators manufactured on or after 1 January 1991 conform to the entrapment protection requirements of the 1988 version of ANSI/UL standard 325.[11] A requirement for redundant entrapment-prevention devices was added in 1993; such a system can use an electric eye, a door edge sensor, or any other device that provides equivalent protection by reversing the travel of the closing door if an object is detected in its path. [12][13]


When your garage door starts acting up, more often than not it is telling you it's time to do a bit of maintenance. So, before hitting the panic button, try these simple repairs. First, examine the rollers and tracks. If you can't remember the last time you cleaned them (and they look the part!), give them a good brushing and then add some lubricant. Next, perform these simple garage door maintenance tasks.
Many garage door opener remote controls use fixed-code encoding which use DIP switches or soldering to do the address pins coding process, and they usually use pt2262/pt2272 or compatible ICs. For these fixed-code garage door opener remotes, one can easily clone the existing remote using a self-learning remote control duplicator (copy remote) which can make a copy of the remote using face-to-face copying.
Most doors come with electric door openers. After a while these openers malfunction and need to be replaced. If your opener is broken, you're in luck. These repairs don't cost very much and can be replaced easily. You might even be able to do it yourself. Learn how to replace your garage door opener in 15 minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeaR6Yhx6IY.
Spring rate and torque: In my spring replacement above, the wire size was d = 0.2253 inches, and the ID was 2 inches, giving a mean diameter D = 2.2253 inches. The number of coils is L/d = 24 inches / 0.2253 = 107, less about 5 dead coils on the winding cones, or 102 active coils. Thus the spring rate is K = (π*28.5*10^6 * (0.2253)^4) / (32 * 102 * 2.2253) = 31.8 in-lb/turn (IPPT). Winding 7.5 turns * 31.8 in-lb/turn yields a torque of 238 in-lbs per spring.
A garage door is a large door on a garage that opens either manually or by an electric motor (a garage door opener). Garage doors are frequently large enough to accommodate automobiles and other vehicles. Small garage doors may be made in a single panel that tilts up and back across the garage ceiling. Larger doors are usually made in several jointed panels that roll up on tracks across the garage ceiling, or into a roll above the doorway. The operating mechanism is spring-loaded or counterbalanced to offset the weight of the door and reduce human or motor effort required to operate the door. Less commonly, some garage doors slide or swing horizontally. Doors are made of wood, metal, or fiberglass, and may be insulated to prevent heat loss. Warehouses, bus garages and locomotive sheds have larger versions.
For garage doors with windows, try to match the glass style of your house windows to provide a more consistent look. It’s also recommended that you install insulated windows if your garage is heated or air conditioned. If you opt for an uninsulated garage door, make sure it’s made of thick steel – specifically 24-gauge. Thicker steel will help prevent dents.
Ryan, the tech that did the initial inspection and Kyle, the tech that did the installation were both extremely skilled, knowledgeable, and have excellent customer service. They arrived on time as scheduled. Explained well what needs to be done and did the job well. We’re very pleased and recommend Castle Garage Doors. We’re giving Ryan, Kyle 10 🌟 along with Hollie for having excellent customer service in making sure the whole process ran smoothly. Thank you 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 -Grandpa & Grandma Read less
You might genuinely need some extra parts when you thought you simply needed a broken spring replaced, and a good serviceman will perform a simple inspection to identify such parts. Nor is it unreasonable for a business to charge separately for a service call versus repair work actually performed. But the best protection for you as a buyer, being somewhat at the mercy of whomever you decide to bring on site, is to understand what is being done, and ask intelligently for a clear explanation or demonstration of why extra parts are required.

Garage Door Opener Company

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