I repeat my caution about the uncertainty of interpreting color codes. A professional installer reading this page emailed me to say that the red color indicates the springs are right-hand windings, not the DASMA color code for the wire size. But this photo shows both a right- and a left-hand spring, and both have the red paint on the cones and set-screws. I conclude it is prudent to make your own measurements and analysis. Do not rely on the colors on old installations. The only time I would respect them would be on new parts that carried documentation giving the code.

Ryan Fleming, Technician with Precision Door replaced a broken garage door spring at our home last night and I was so impressed with his knowledge, professionalism and positive attitude that I felt compelled to write this review. We have been customers of Precision Door for over 5 years and have always been pleased with how promptly and cost effectively they perform repair and maintenance work. I highly recommend both Ryan and Precision Door.read more
To estimate the maximum physical force required to wind these springs, consider that they are balancing the weight of the door with a torque applied to a lift drum on each end of the torsion shaft. The lift drums have a 2-inch radius, which is the standard residential size, and corresponds conveniently to about a 1-foot circumference. If we pessimistically assume the 10-by-7-foot door has a weight of 350 pounds, this implies a torque of 350 pounds on a 2-inch radius, that is, 700 inch-pounds, or 58 foot-pounds. Each of the two springs should be exerting slightly less than half of the balancing torque, or 29 foot-pounds. Compare this to, say, the bolts in an automobile, which are typically torqued to values of about 50 foot-pounds, or tire lug nuts, which may be torqued to well over 100 foot-pounds.

A spring design manual, also called a rate book, gives tables that relate the torque constant ("rate") and maximum turns for springs of given wire size, diameter, and length. For example, a typical page in a rate book would show a table for a given wire size and inside diameter, the maximum inch-pounds (MIP) of torque available for a standard lifetime of 10,000 cycles in that size, the weight of the spring per linear inch, and the rates of the spring (as IPPT, inch-pounds per turn) for each of various lengths. From these figures one can calculate the lifting capacity, substitutions, conversions, and cycle life upgrades for a door of given weight and drum geometry. The weight-lifting capacity of a given spring is calculated based on its torque constant (IPPT, or inch-pounds per turn), which is the rotational version of the spring constant that characterizes the spring. The IPPT constant is found from tables giving IPPT for given spring dimensions (wire-size/diameter/length). The same tables may indicate the maximum number of turns for various expected lifetimes in cycles. The torque required to balance a given door can be calculated from the weight of the door times the moment arm of the drums (as we do below under "Calculating the Forces We Will Be Handling"). The ultimate torque of the spring in the fully-wound condition is the number of turns (when fully-wound) times the IPPT constant. Choosing a spring to balance the door then simply requires matching the ultimate torque of the spring to the balancing torque.


A common material for a new garage door is steel sheet formed or stamped to look like a raised panel wooden door. Steel doors are available in uninsulated, insulated, and double skin steel. A design mimicking carriage house doors has become popular since early 2000s, and many manufacturers clad the exterior of a steel door with composite, vinyl boards, or other trim to give it the appearance of wood.


At this point I weighed the unlifted door to confirm and fine-tune my calculations. This is not strictly necessary, but it makes the adjustments easier to perform, if you happen to have a scale with the requisite capacity. With some helpers, we first lifted the door a few inches and rested it on blocks of wood to provide clearance underneath. Then I slid a 400-pound-capacity freight scale under the center of the door, we lifted again to remove the blocks, and lowered the door gently onto the scale. This door weighed in at 238 pounds, which is very heavy for a single-car door. Since the outside of the door carries the 3/4-inch plywood paneling to match the house, and that plywood weighs about 2 lbs/sq-ft, I estimate the door weight to be about 7 x 10 x 2 = 140 lbs of paneling with the rest 238 - 140 = 98 lbs the interior panels, hardware, and cobwebs. Knowing this total weight will help later in adjusting the torsion on the springs. After weighing, we removed the scale and blocks, leaving the door fully lowered again. Had I not had a high-capacity freight scale, I might have improvised a crude weighing device from levers and smaller weights of known mass, or a lever arm pressing a reduced proportion of the full weight onto a lower-capacity scale. Another factor to remember is that The weight of a wood door can vary with humidity.
Door repair business advice (warning to consumers, you are not allowed to know this): Thinner wire is excellent for shortening spring lifetimes, lightening your inventory on a service truck, and getting paid for frequent service calls. This is why your industry chooses to set "standard" springs to have thin wire and despicably short lifetimes. If you want to maximize profits and fleece your customers, install springs that predictably break in about 7 years on a door that should last decades, even though it is just as easy for you to install slightly more expensive springs that should last the life of the door. Remember that the customer wanted the cheapest price, so you need not feel any guilt about this low-balling.
To make sure the job gets done right, our professional installers are local, licensed and insured. With a 9.7 out of 10 VOC score, our garage installers will exceed your expectations, provide reliable service, and install attractive garage doors that will transform your home’s appearance. All labor, products and installations are 100% backed by The Home Depot. Service you can trust.
If this manipulative, we-are-your-nanny business approach is truly in our best interests as consumers, then we shouldn't be allowed near ladders, lawn mowers, or power tools. Those products are just as hazardous and prone to misuse as torsion springs, yet no one thinks of them as forbidden. The only genuine difference is that torsion springs are a hazardous thing you need only rarely, while a lawn mower is a hazardous thing you need all the time.

We want to serve you not only today, but also in the years ahead. To do that, we make sure that we provide prompt, professional, well-trained technicians that efficiently get the job done right the first time. We take pride in doing everything possible to eliminate warranty issues and to ensure that our clients are thoroughly pleased and return to us for all garage door needs.
Electric Garage Door Openers – Service and repair of the electric garage door opener itself, including the lift mechanism that pulls the door up and guides it down. This is typically not part of the garage door itself and is serviced and repaired on its own interval. Typical service includes inspection, repair, adjustment, and lubrication if needed. Also, we typically inspect the mounting of the unit as well as its attachment to the door itself.

Torsion springs are devices that lift most of the weight of a garage door so that the door can be opened manually or by an electric opener. The torsion principle is applied via an efficient and economical apparatus consisting of a torsion shaft under spring torsion, which turns lift drums, which wind cables attached to the door near the bottom. All of this apparatus is mounted over the top of the door. The energy stored is sufficient, in an uncontrolled release, to break things, hurt you, or perhaps even kill you. The same could be said of jacking up your car to change a tire, or mowing your lawn, or raising children, so it is not crazy to want to do this yourself.
The material and style of your door as well as the replacement parts needed will impact the total cost of your project. It would cost less to install a steel door with no opener then it would to install a wood door with an opener etc... High tech doors come with enery-effecient glaze and thick insualation as well as finshed interiors and other upgrades. These doors are more expensive but are more reliable and durable.

A standard residential door raises 7.5 feet, but since the door goes horizontal this is equivalent to raising the whole door for half that distance, or about 3.75 feet. So if the door weighs, say, 150 lbs, then the energy supplied by the springs is 3.75 * 150, or about 563 foot-pounds. This is like throwing a 50-lb sack of cement up a 11-foot flight of stairs. Or catching a 50-lb sack of cement dropped from 11 feet up.
Tools in Action says the Ryobi Ultra Quiet has plenty of versatility, as you can plug devices into the opener hardware, like a Bluetooth speaker, a fan, or even an 18V Ryobi cordless tool battery. When the opener has power, it will charge the battery. But if your home ever loses power, the 18V battery works as a backup to the garage door opener, allowing it to operate normally.
Torsion springs have three advantages over extension springs: They’re quieter, safer and easier to fine-tune. Torsion springs are quieter because you don’t have a spring knocking against a roller track. They’re safer because when a spring breaks, it usually stays on the bar. Finally, you can fine-tune the tension on a torsion spring so the door is perfectly balanced. Setting the tension on torsion springs has always been very dangerous, but torsion and extension spring systems with easy, do-it-yourself tensioning (Photo 7) are available. If you don’t use one of these DIY-friendly, easy tensioning systems (Clopay EZ-Set Spring and Wayne-Dalton TorqueMaster are two brands), you should hire a professional to release and set the tension on a torsion spring.
In the market for overhead garage doors? Browse our selection of Pella garage doors. You'll find many options for single garage doors, double garage doors, insulated garage doors and even roll up garage doors. Lowe’s also carries garage door screens—great for those who love to spend hours in the garage, but don’t want to deal with the bugs and pests that invite themselves in. We also carry garage door hardware, garage door springs, garage door decorative hardware and garage door sensors, and don’t forget to ask about our garage door installation and garage door opener installation. Once you've decided a garage door fits your home, you'll need to find the garage door opener that works best for you. At Lowe’s, we carry Genie garage door openers, Chamberlain garage door openers and SOMMER garage door openers that will work seamlessly with your garage doors. We now offer a garage door opener that's compatible with your Iris home automation system, too. Whether you prefer opening your garage with a garage door remote or garage door keypad, you'll find it at Lowe’s. Our selection of garage remotes includes everything from universal garage door remotes to specific brands like Chamberlain garage door opener remotes and Chamberlain garage door keypads. We also carry backup batteries, nylon garage door rollers, garage door parts, garage door opener parts and rail extensions to make sure your garage door is in good working order. Plus, we even offer garage door installations services, which include garage door spring repair and replacements, and garage door cable repair and replacements. We can also replace your garage door weather seal, also known as garage door threshold seals, and install a new garage door opener battery.
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