A knowledgeable installer with good inventory can offer you upgraded spring lifetimes by using longer, heavier springs than were originally installed. For example, you may be offered more expensive springs with expected lifetimes of 15, 25, or even 100 thousand cycles, instead of the standard 10 thousand. The difference in labor to substitute this upgrade is nil. Since the dealer's cost of springs is proportional to weight, and typically a small part of the job price anyway, the dealer's cost for this upgrade is slight. This would seem to be a excellent option to offer every customer, and if correctly calculated and reasonably priced, one that you should take as cost-effective. Yet you may not be offered such an upgrade, if the installer is not adept at making the rather simple calculations, or if the optional springs are not on his truck, or if you're not around to be asked, or if the installer just doesn't like selling or taking time to discuss such details.

Since their invention in the 1920s, electric garage door openers have come a long way. Garage door openers work by using a trolley connected to an arm that attaches to the top of the garage door and slides back and forth on a track, which opens and closes the garage door. When operating the motor, a chain or belt turns and pulls the trolley along the track. A good garage door opener will have a horsepower of 1/2 HP, 3/4 HP, or 1-1/4 HP. Garage door openers have the ability to open and close a limited number of times in power outage emergencies. Security is something else to consider when purchasing an opener. It's helpful to have sensors that will stop the operation of the garage door when a person, vehicle, or other obstacle is in the way.


With good looks, modest cost, and solid return on your investment, a new garage door is the Triple Crown of curb appeal projects. According to the “Remodeling Impact Report” from the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, the national median cost of a garage door replacement project is $2,300 and recovers 87% of your investment if you sell your house — one of the highest percentage of recovered costs in the “Report.”
Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.
Since 1975, Kitsap Garage door has provided Kitsap Penninsula with reliable, comprehensive and responsive residential and commercial garage door repair, maintenance and installation services. At Kitsap Garage Door, our primary focus is offering Bremerton, Shelton and Kitsap, WA, home and business owners with the highest quality products and services, as well as exceptional customer experiences marked with free service estimates, workmanship warranties, reliable support and emergency services.
One might stack lumber or arrange some other low platform for a steady footing, instead of the ladder. The aluminum ladder shown here is the splendid 16-foot Krause Multimatic, which carries a Type 1A Industrial rating (300 pound working load); I highly recommend it. However, product liability apparently forced this company into bankruptcy in September 2000 and the company ceased operations in June 2001; see http://www.krauseladders.com (this Web site went dead sometime in mid-2002). The world is a dangerous place.
I've provided this information for free, in hopes it will help you either fix your door yourself, or find a competent professional service to do it for you at a reasonable price. If you've been helped by this Web page, as many have, all I would ask is that you create a link to this page (http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm) from any pages you maintain. You will thereby help others searching for complete and reliable information on this type of repair to find it with a Web search.
Whether you are a new homeowner looking to personalize your home or you need to replace your existing garage door, Clopay® makes it easy to find the right choice for your home. Your garage door can account for up to 30% of your home’s façade, so choosing the right style can have a great impact on your curb appeal. Clopay doors are available in a variety of styles including carriage-house, raised-panel and modern, all with convenient overhead operation. Choose from a variety of colors, woodgrain finishes, materials and hardware to complement your home’s exterior.
Having a mismatched pair makes it difficult to specify the correct matched-pair replacements. To obtain replacement springs for a mismatched pair, you can either specify the same odd pair, try to calculate the equivalent matched pair sizes, or (this is the best method:) measure an accurate door weight and calculate the right spring size(s) "from scratch". The spring seller should be able to do the calculations from your accurate measurements of weight, height, and drum size; or you can attempt the calculations yourself using my engineering formulas below.
It you have a tilt-up door, you are looking at a $150 - $200 repair or replacement. If it's a roll-up door it's going to cost you more. Roll-up door spring repair or replacement is usually around $200 - $250 for a 2 car door. If the brackets need to be disassembled to remove the springs due to the shaft not sliding sideways enough it will cost you an additional $50 - $100.
The one excuse that makes the most sense is, "if we sell springs to a do-it-yourselfer, and he gets hurt installing it, we could get sued." I can sympathize with someone who wants to sell only to the trade and not bother with the risk of a spurious product liability lawsuit from an ignorant member of the public. But the lawn-mower dealers have figured out how to manage that kind of exposure, so this is not an absolute barrier to retailing garage door parts to the public. It doesn't explain why torsion springs at retail are virtually non-existent.

The Genie SilentMax 750 belt drive garage door opener isn't as feature-packed as the Chamberlain B970, but its value is hard to overlook. The 75-HPc motor isn't as strong as the B970s, but is still plenty strong for any residential use, and the opener is widely judged to be pleasingly quiet. Smart features are built in, too, but using those requires the addition of the optional Genie Aladdin Connect module (Est. $95). The biggest downside is that there's no battery back-up.
Sectional: Also known as a raised panel door, this door is the most common. It is made of several horizontal panels hinged together, fitted with wheels and mounted within a track. The biggest advantage of this door is it takes up relatively little space and easily controlled with a standard remote garage door opener for a nominal cost. Their moving parts are readily accessible which can keep repair costs low. The average cost for sectional door repairs is $128.
Torsion springs have three advantages over extension springs: They’re quieter, safer and easier to fine-tune. Torsion springs are quieter because you don’t have a spring knocking against a roller track. They’re safer because when a spring breaks, it usually stays on the bar. Finally, you can fine-tune the tension on a torsion spring so the door is perfectly balanced. Setting the tension on torsion springs has always been very dangerous, but torsion and extension spring systems with easy, do-it-yourself tensioning (Photo 7) are available. If you don’t use one of these DIY-friendly, easy tensioning systems (Clopay EZ-Set Spring and Wayne-Dalton TorqueMaster are two brands), you should hire a professional to release and set the tension on a torsion spring.

I mentioned earlier that this apparatus had at least one prior spring replacement, with a single longer spring having been replaced by two shorter springs. The clamping of the original spring had pressed dimples and an eccentric distortion into the hollow shaft. While this distortion was large enough to block the old cones from sliding across, I was able to remove the old hardware by just sliding them in the other direction. I did not have to bother trying to press out this distortion, since I could just work around it.
The replacement springs in my case proved to be 0.2253 wire size, 2.0 inch (inside) diameter, and 24 inches long, in a pair of one left- and one right-hand winding. Actually, the old springs in these pictures were a slightly smaller size, but another similar door on this garage was better balanced by that size. Whoever installed the old springs didn't quite get the weight and size just right; it is not unusual to find a repair service installing a slightly off-balance spring size that happened to already be on the truck during the service call. My electric opener had no trouble handling the small imbalance. But since it is safer to reduce the electric operating force as much as possible through careful balancing, I chose the size that was working better on the other door. The Chamberlain brand electric openers (also sold by Sears) I have incorporate a plastic worm gear that tends to wear out after some years of use, requiring a disassembly and installation of a $20 repair kit; this wear is minimized by a properly balanced door.
The salesman-disguised-as-technician trick: In this trick, you arrange for a service call to your home, perhaps paying a small fee up-front, and a neatly uniformed man arrives in a very technical-looking truck, carrying an impressive tool kit. He carefully examines your door, perhaps using some impressive testing devices to lend weight to his expertise. He then condemns your door as not worth repairing, and tells you, to his sincere regret, that you must have a new one. In fact, this technician is not a technician, but a salesman who only sells, and does not repair, doors. Even if he doesn't sell you, he is doing well just collecting fees for service calls that are no more than sales visits. He doesn't actually have to ever fix anything, and he may not even be capable of doing so himself. He's an expert at selling, which genuine technicians are not. In the worst case, when you refuse to buy a whole new door, he might refuse to follow up with a visit from an actual technician, either outright, or only with an unacceptable delay ("we're too busy to get a guy out until next week", when your car is trapped). If you find yourself closing in on this situation, then politely invite him to leave, and try someone else. That is your right, and in fact the only power you have to bargain in such circumstances. At that point, he may offer to promptly bring in his competent colleague, who will turn up lacking charm and looking awful, but might actually do the work, possibly at a fair price. If so, you will have beaten a legal variation of the classic illegal bait-and-switch (see below). The switch was attempted, but not required, which makes this legal. This is a hazard of any direct-sales situation. Because it rarely appears in everyday retail sales, it can surprise the unwary.
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Recently another type of opener, known as the jackshaft opener, has become more popular. This style of opener was used frequently on commercial doors but in recent years has been adapted for residential use. This style of opener consists of a motor that attaches to the side of the torsion rod and moves the door up and down by simply spinning the rod. These openers need a few extra components to function safely for residential use. These include a cable tension monitor, to detect when a cable is broken, and a separate locking mechanism to lock the door when it is fully closed. These have the advantage that they free up ceiling space that an ordinary opener and rail would occupy. These also have the disadvantage that the door must have a torsion rod to attach the motor to.
Critical measurements: Torsion springs come a variety of standardized sizes, so you have to carefully measure the old springs to know what to order for proper replacements. Tables of standard sizes and designs are on the Web, such as here [www.industrialspring.com]. The four critical measurements (all in inches) are: (1) the wire thickness (which I'm measuring here with a dial caliper; you can also measure the length of a number of closely stacked turns with a ruler and divide by the number of turns in the stack, measuring 10 turns this way makes the math easy), (2) the inside diameter (not outside!) of the relaxed (not wound!) coil, (3) the overall length of the relaxed (not wound!) spring coils, not including the winding cones, and (4) the right- or left-hand winding of the spring. One must glibly quote those figures to the spring supplier, otherwise one's lack of expertise will be obvious, and one will not be worthy of buying the parts.

The door and tracks at this stage of the repair are in a minimum-energy condition. This is a good opportunity to work on any hinges, bearings, rollers, cables, or tracks that need tightening, repair, lubrication, or replacement. Again, these parts should be available from the spring source, and should be ordered based on a pre-inspection. Home-improvement stores carry some of these parts, but the type and quality may not be the best.

A common material for a new garage door is steel sheet formed or stamped to look like a raised panel wooden door. Steel doors are available in uninsulated, insulated, and double skin steel. A design mimicking carriage house doors has become popular since early 2000s, and many manufacturers clad the exterior of a steel door with composite, vinyl boards, or other trim to give it the appearance of wood.
Those who benefit from this anti-competitive behavior have many excuses for it. They claim that the product is too dangerous and infrequently needed for the public to purchase directly. They say the job is hazardous and requires techniques and tools with which the amateur will rarely practice, which is true. They write me in anger saying I don't understand how expensive it is to put a truck on the road with a technician and parts and salary and benefits and insurance and advertising and every other common business expense. They say it will take the homeowner hours of effort to do this safely and correctly, while they can do it in a fraction of that time and at a price that isn't worth the effort to save. But should they set themselves up as the judge of what you can and cannot do? Of what is an economical use of your time? Imposing minimum order quantities or charging retail prices for small orders is legitimate; inquiring into the purchaser's background is not.
The optician's trick: The serviceman looks over your door with lots of scowling, chin-scratching, and tsk-tsking. You ask, "how much?" He replies with the fair price. If you don't flinch at that price, he says, "for the parts", while quoting a large additional cost for the labor. If you still don't flinch, he adds, "each," while pointing back and forth to your pair of springs. (I hope none of you service people are reading this!) I call this the "optician's trick" after the old vaudeville joke about lenses, frames, and left/right.

We lead busy and sometimes hectic lives. It's easy for someone low on sleep and high on stress to accidently bump into their garage door leaving a little damage. If you're lucky it's just an individual garage door panel that's been damaged. This will leave you with the option of garage door panel replacment. There's a chance it might cost you upwards of $150-200 to spot repair damaged garage door panel. If it happens to be an in-production model, they probably will be able to repair or replace the entire panel (if needed) for $250-400. Unfortunately if you've got an older model of garage door the panels may no longer be in production. This might seem like a disadvantage because you'll end up having to just replace the entire door. Many times it's actually easier and more cost effective to just replace the garage door.
I was careful not to assume that the previous installation correctly oriented the right- and left-hand springs on the correct sides of the center bearing plate. They could have been installed backwards by an incompetent installer, resulting in them having been wound looser (larger diameter coil) instead of tighter (smaller diameter coil) than when in their relaxed state, and if so I would have corrected them on the new installation. The proper orientation of the springs applies their reaction torque from tighter winding such that it turns the drums to lift the door. Verifying this is a rather simple exercise in mechanical visualization, but does require some care to be certain of correctness. If you were to install the springs backwards, and then start to wind them in the wrong direction, then the torsion bar will start winding the drums backwards, and not holding against the vise pliers, which should be obvious to inspection. Winding a spring backwards also tends to screw the spring off the cones; this error cannot proceed too far before the spring slips off the cones.
Your ad had no cheap coupons or promises.. Just business. Service was more than prompt. No attempt to fix something that was not broke or did not try to sell me anything I did not need. He stated the price at the beginning and stuck to it. (I was so pleased, I did not bother to mention a senior discount.) Very, very pleased that I have found someone I can trust and rely on. GaryRichard
The low rating on the CS is due to the fact that inwas out of town and my wife called because the garage door wouldn't open. We had repairs to the only other exit, and the CS said because it could be opened manually, it was no emergency. She was stuck in the house for over Sixteen hours. No emergency crew came out. Steve, a tech who came out the first time, fixed the door. It is not his fault CS took their sweet time to help a 45 year customer. I commend Steve. I do NOT have anything good to say about CS.
Some of the best garage door openers offer special features like a backup power source or a timer that automatically closes the door behind you at a predetermined time. While the door openers we reviewed vary in terms of power, noise and efficiency, they are all effective in the all-important task of letting you come and go with the simple push of a button. Here are the criteria we used to rank the top garage door openers:
Here’s an opener that comes with all the bells and whistles. Featuring an ultra quiet belt drive, you’ll be thankful you purchased one like this especially if you have a room positioned near or above the garage. It’s also got battery backup so if the power goes out, you can still get in and out with ease for up to 20 open and close cycles for the first 24 hours of an outage. And for the technology savvy will appreciate its MyQ smartphone control technology that allows you to control the door via an app on your iPhone or Android, plus you’ll receive safety notifications if you’re away from the house and the door opens or closes. And for extra peace of mind, there’s also a feature that will automatically close the door after a set amount of time — you know, just in case you forget.
Your garage door is most likely the largest opening on your home, and as a result, it can affect your home’s energy efficiency. For homes in areas that experience colder winters or warmer summers, choosing an insulated door can save you money and improve the comfort of your home. Doors insulated with our Intellicore® insulation technology operate more quietly and are more durable. We also offer insulated glass window options that can help maintain energy efficiency and allow natural light into your garage. Visit our insulation guide to learn more about garage door insulation, or learn more about Intellicore® here.
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