Resetting the drums, if needed: If the drums were incorrectly set in their old positions, one must reset both drums in new positions on the shaft. This is complicated by the presence of old dimples in the torsion shaft from previous setting(s), which must be avoided lest they improperly influence the new setting of the drums. To begin this process of resetting the drums, the door must first be lowered and resting level on the floor, the spring(s) must be in the unwound condition with their set-screws loosened, and the lift cables wrapped around the drums. If for some reason the door does not rest level on the floor, such as the floor being uneven, then insert temporary shims between the door bottom and the floor to bring the door up to level. Loosen the set-screws on the drums, and turn the torsion shaft to avoid the old dimples from the set-screws in the old drum position. Tighten the set-screw on the left drum (that is, on your left as you face the door from in the garage), creating a new dimple, and apply tension to its cable with the locking-pliers technique, enough tension to keep the cable taut but not enough to start to move the door up. Attach and wind the cable on the opposite (right) drum by hand until the cable is similarly taut, and set the screw, remembering that tightening the screw will tend to add a bit of extra tension to the cable. Both drums should now be fixed on the torsion shaft, with the cables about equally taut (listen to the sound when you pluck them like a guitar string) and the door still level on the ground. Setting the left drum first, and the right drum second, will allow you to take up any slack in the cable introduced by the left drum rotating slightly with respect to the torsion shaft as you tighten the set screws. This alignment and balance of the cables, drums, and door is critical to smooth operation and proper closing. If you have a single-spring assembly, the distance along the torsion tube from the spring cone to one drum is longer than to the other drum, which allows a bit more twist to one side than the other, and you may have to compensate with the setting of the drums.
I could not be happier with the service from Precision, and Tom, especially. About a year and a half ago I called to have my garage door that was sticking, repaired. Tom came out same day and replaced, adjusted, serviced all moving parts and got it going smoothly. He has since come out within hours of a call to adjust and keep (what might not be the best) door, (originally installed by someone else), operating well. I recommend Precision and Tom with complete confidence.
Tom was professional, knowledgeable, and very friendly. He arrived at my house within the time frame he said he would (nothing is worse than a late technician). Once he arrived, he assessed the problem, explained it clearly and concisely, and informed me he had the parts available with him to fix it. He fixed the issues speedily and I was able to return to work within the hour. The price was reasonable too. I would recommend Precision to any of my friends and neighbors. Thanks Tom!
Today's garage doors come with those door sensors, and if anything is in the path of the door the sensor detects it and raises the door back to the open position. These precautions are important for families with young children or pets. Even if you don't have a mini me or furry friend running around your yard, it's a good idea to have a garage door that is safe for you, your guests and your belongings. 
Though you can do some maintenance to your garage doors on your own, it may be a good idea to schedule routine inspections with a professional. A typical service call will include a manual inspection of the door and opener. Then adjustments can be made including spring tension, chain/belt tension, limits and force adjustments and door lubrication. Fees for this service vary from place to place, but garage door repairs typically cost between $147 and $340.
Carriage: These doors mimic the look of doors found on old carriage houses in the days of horses and buggies. Because of their rustic look, they are often favored in the West and Southwest of the United States. The doors swing open like oversized French doors and hang from jambs on hinges. With their unique look, they create an area of visual interest for your home and are quite energy efficient. The downside is they require a considerable amount of clearance to work properly. Because most carriage garage doors are largely composed of wood, you may need to replace deteriorating or rotting door materials. The average cost for carriage garage door repairs is $133.
Install the stiffening strut on top of the top section of steel doors with the section lying flat. Then install the opener bracket that replaces the center bracket between the top two sections. While you’re working on the sections, protect them from scratches by putting carpet scraps on top of your sawhorses. Now, slide the rollers into the roller brackets.
If you have paired springs, you can take a shortcut here instead of using locking pliers. Simply apply a slight torsion to the bar by clamping one of the springs with an easy half-turn or so applied. This will hold the lift cables in slight tension while you wind the other spring. If you have a single spring design, you can't use this trick, and have to use the locking pliers.
You might genuinely need some extra parts when you thought you simply needed a broken spring replaced, and a good serviceman will perform a simple inspection to identify such parts. Nor is it unreasonable for a business to charge separately for a service call versus repair work actually performed. But the best protection for you as a buyer, being somewhat at the mercy of whomever you decide to bring on site, is to understand what is being done, and ask intelligently for a clear explanation or demonstration of why extra parts are required.

Garage Door Opener Company

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