We have everything needed and the expertise required to make accurate repairs for every variety of garage door. Whether you have a steel, wooden, or composite garage door, one of our team members will be happy to help you diagnose the problem and then apply an effective solution. Our repair services include repairs for springs, cables, rollers, tracks, sections, and more! Is your door noisy? We know the right way to fix it! Call us any timeyou need us to fix a problem.

​We know that your commercial ​door can take a beating. That's why we build quality, tough commercial doors to withstand the daily wear and tear of owning and operating a business. Engineered for excellence and backed by a dedicated nationwide network of Red Ribbon Distributors, Overhead Door™ commercial and industrial doors are the premier choice for durability, serviceability and hassle-free performance. ​​​​


Wood - Wood garage doors are sturdy and quite beautiful. However, if you live in a humid climate, your doors will be prone to rotting and splitting. If your wood is painted, you must also factor in the costs of painting as part of your regular maintenance routine. The cost of repairing the wood varies depending on the type. However, average cost to repair a wood panel is $190 to $215.

Extremely straightforward and efficient estimating and installation process. We purchased a Clopay sectional steel garage door for our double garage that works flawlessly with our existing door operator. The guys suggested an insulated door, but I thanked them and said no because I don't care for the garage to warm up in the winter and create a corrosive atmosphere of melting snow and salt. Great job!

Great!  We specialize in all sorts of garage door repair work.  Working around the garage door can be fairly dangerous if you’re trying to repair this issue on your own.  Most garage door companies will quickly remind folks about this, and it’s true.  Their are some hazards to watch out for when working around these heavy and high tension doors.  We recommend you give an expert a call to address the issue in a safe and timely manner for you.
Over the past 15 years, we've been providing professional garage door repair and services to families across the Lehigh Valley and Western New Jersey. We're a family-owned business, and we treat every customer as if they are family as well. We pride ourselves on our dedication to exceptional service. If you are having an issue with your garage door, we can help! We service ALL makes and models of garage doors and garage door openers. Whether you need a repair, a replacement, or routine maintenance, you can rely on us to get the job done at an affordable price.
Before setting the last panel in the tracks, set the power unit on the actual frame and slide it in the ends. Hardened screws are used to attach the center bracket (Image 1). They are a different type screw — they are tougher and will last a lot longer. Make sure the bracket is level (to the eye) when installed and leave the bracket a little loose so adjustments can be made. Fasten down all the hinges (Image 2).
The Keychain Garage Door Remote offers portable control The Keychain Garage Door Remote offers portable control with the highest level of security. Featuring a three-button design this compact remote controls up to three garage door openers individually. Easily programmed and compatible with nearly every garage door opener made by Chamberlain LiftMaster and Craftsman it’s the easy option for ...  More + Product Details Close
AE Door & Window is that company. You don’t survive and grow for more than 30 years of providing garage door repair service and installation without taking care of your customers. Our reputation for offering quality garage door service is unquestioned. It’s why we have an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau and countless positive testimonials from satisfied customers.
Repair of garage doors is a licensed trade in many jurisdictions, and manipulation of the market inevitably follows. Look in your phone book yellow-pages under "garage doors" and you'll find a lot of big, costly ads for door service. The profits are quite juicy, I'm sure. The customers need service urgently, and this need will typically arrive suddenly and at a busy time when shopping for prices is not convenient. A few dollars in parts, an hour of labor and travel, and a $150 invoice (assuming the outfit is charging fairly, some are not). Lately (2006) I hear of outfits charging $200 or $300 for this work, and occasionally a story of a $500 or $800 service call. You'll also find the phonebook advertisers waiting eagerly for your call, because artificially high prices inevitably lead to an oversupply of service firms working under capacity.
The salesman-disguised-as-technician trick: In this trick, you arrange for a service call to your home, perhaps paying a small fee up-front, and a neatly uniformed man arrives in a very technical-looking truck, carrying an impressive tool kit. He carefully examines your door, perhaps using some impressive testing devices to lend weight to his expertise. He then condemns your door as not worth repairing, and tells you, to his sincere regret, that you must have a new one. In fact, this technician is not a technician, but a salesman who only sells, and does not repair, doors. Even if he doesn't sell you, he is doing well just collecting fees for service calls that are no more than sales visits. He doesn't actually have to ever fix anything, and he may not even be capable of doing so himself. He's an expert at selling, which genuine technicians are not. In the worst case, when you refuse to buy a whole new door, he might refuse to follow up with a visit from an actual technician, either outright, or only with an unacceptable delay ("we're too busy to get a guy out until next week", when your car is trapped). If you find yourself closing in on this situation, then politely invite him to leave, and try someone else. That is your right, and in fact the only power you have to bargain in such circumstances. At that point, he may offer to promptly bring in his competent colleague, who will turn up lacking charm and looking awful, but might actually do the work, possibly at a fair price. If so, you will have beaten a legal variation of the classic illegal bait-and-switch (see below). The switch was attempted, but not required, which makes this legal. This is a hazard of any direct-sales situation. Because it rarely appears in everyday retail sales, it can surprise the unwary.
The most common grade of torsion springs have an expected life of about 10,000 cycles. The hardened and tempered steel experiences tremendous forces each time the door opens or closes. Gradually, the steel fatigues with each flexure, and eventually cracks and breaks, usually releasing its stored energy in an instant with a horrific "sproing" noise or bang. If you average about two car trips per day, opening and closing the door a total of 4 times daily when you come and go, then that expected life becomes 2500 days, or only about 7 years. If you have an automatic opener, then if you're like me, you tend to cycle the door even more frequently, and can expect the need for spring replacement even sooner. Moreover, my three-car garage has three doors, so on average I can expect a repair job every few years. Over a lifetime, it is very economical to do these repairs myself.

In 1992 the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission released new rules for automatic garage door openers. Anything manufactured after 1993 was required to include either an electric eye (a pair of sensors that detect an object obstructing the doorway) or a wall-mounted control button that users hold down in order to close the door entirely. Most manufacturers opted for the electric eye method, sometimes referred to as safety sensors.
Next, the torsion shaft is reassembled with the new springs, the drums repositioned loosely on the shaft, this whole assembly slid back into the end bearings, and the drum set-screws tightened down. I tightened the set-screws about 1/2 or 3/4 of a turn after contact with the shaft, which provides a good grip, but does not distort the shaft. The drums can be set on their old positions, if they were correctly installed, which is snug up against the end bearings to remove any longitudinal play in the torsion shaft. Now the lift cable can be reattached to the drums, and a slight temporary torque applied to the shaft to keep the cable taut while the first spring is wound. This temporary torque is conveniently applied with a pair of locking pliers clamped on the shaft, positioned such that they hold the torque by pressing lightly against the wall above the door, before you start the spring winding, The locking pliers stay on the torsion shaft until you have finished the spring winding locked down the spring cone(s) with the setscrew(s), and removed the winding bars. Then you simply remove them with the release on the wrench handle. I feel that any job that doesn't require a trick manipulation with either locking pliers or duct tape (or in the ultimate case, both!) is just too boring. My trusty pliers look a trifle rusty ever since I used them to clamp something on my outdoor TV antenna "temporarily" and left them out in the weather for, oh, several years. The white stuff on the drum is paint overspray from the original painting of the garage interior.
Your ad had no cheap coupons or promises.. Just business. Service was more than prompt. No attempt to fix something that was not broke or did not try to sell me anything I did not need. He stated the price at the beginning and stuck to it. (I was so pleased, I did not bother to mention a senior discount.) Very, very pleased that I have found someone I can trust and rely on. GaryRichard

Garage Door Service

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