Most garage door openers are pretty expensive. So if you need an opener on a budget, the Genie 1035-V (also known as the Genie Chain Drive 500) gives you that desirable low price point. It doesn't have a lot of high-end tech features, nor will it manage heavy garage doors, but it does the basic work of raising and lowering the garage door perfectly well.

(The Wahl correction factor accounts for additional stress in the material due to shear forces, although these forces do not contribute to the spring's torque. These shear forces become significant in designs using a low spring index, which is to say, a relatively thick wire for the coil diameter. The correction factor is applied to scale up the stress S to better predict the fatigue lifetime of the spring.)
Another recent innovation in the garage door opener is a fingerprint-based wireless keypad. This unit attaches to the outside of the garage door on the jamb and allows users to open and close their doors with the press of a finger, rather than creating a personal identification number (PIN). This is especially helpful for families with children who may forget a code and are latchkey kids.
In 1921, C.G Johnson invented the upward-acting garage door and revolutionized the way the world entered their homes. For more than 97 years, Overhead Door™ garage doors have been securing and providing families access to their homes. Overhead Door™ garage doors are assembled in the United States and sold at over 450 authorized Ribbon Distributors throughout North America. The Overhead Door™ brand and Overhead Door™ distributors are synonymous with quality and dependability. To ensure you are getting the genuine, the original, make sure to always look for the Red Ribbon.

Trading wire size for length, diameter, or cycle life: Now we are really going to save you some money, if you just recall your high school algebra class (and I don't mean that cute cheerleader who sat next to you). If you further understand the role of the 4th power of the spring wire size (letter d in the formulas above) in the numerator of the spring rate formula, and how to increase or decrease d to compensate for changes in length, diameter, and cycle life, then you're qualified for elite spring calculations. Matching springs is a matter of equating the 4th power of the proportion in wire size change to the proportion of change in the diameter or length or the product of both diameter and length. However, it is usually best to only increase wire size when substituting a spring, since this does not derate the cycle life. If you observe that the formula for bending stress is proportionate to the inverse 3rd power of the diameter, then physically a proportionate increase in wire size will result in a dramatic increase in cycle life of the 3rd power of that proportion. Trade-off example: Yawn with me while we ponder my original spring once more. Let's say I was in a fit of engineering mania, and wanted to replace my spring having a 0.2253 inch diameter wire (d = 0.2253) with a 0.262 wire version (d = 0.262). How much longer is the spring with equal torque rate, assuming we use the same coil diameter? The proportion of this change is 0.262/0.2253 = 1.163, and the 4th power of that is 1.83. This means the length must increase by a factor of 1.83 (again, not counting dead coils). Recalling that the length in Example 1 was 102 non-dead coils, the heavier wire spring must be about 1.83*102 = 187 coils, which when adding 5 dead coils and multiplying by the wire size to get the overall length, is (187+5)*0.262 = 50 inches, versus 24 inches in the original. So using this heavier wire more than doubles the length (and thus the mass and thus the cost). While the cost about doubles, the stress goes down by the inverse 3rd power of the wire size proportion, or 1/(1.163**3) = 0.64. Sress is favorably, non-linearly related to cycle lifetime (halving the stress more than doubles the lifetime), so this decreased stress should more than double the expected lifetime of the spring. While the up-front cost is more, the true cost of an amortized lifetime is much less. In short, per cycle it is cheaper. Ah, the wonders of engineering calculations! Conclusion: Observe that the stress formula (and thus the cycle lifetime) depends only on wire diameter (d) for equal torques. Thus the only way to improve cycle lifetime is to use heavier wire. For equal torques, heavier wire size, due to the exponents in the formulas, increases cycle lifetime much faster than it increases mass (and thus cost), physically speaking.
The disaster-is-nigh technique: As he inspects your door, the serviceman grimly calls your attention to "cracks" in your garage door. These appear very faintly in the middle of the door where the panels bow under their own weight when the door is up. This is normal, but the type of thing you wouldn't casually observe yourself. This surprising revelation disarms you, and you may find yourself strangely susceptible to the pitch for an entire new door.
Furthermore, newer doors come with more improved security features, helping to improve the way you protect your home and loved ones. While older doors are easy to break into, whether through breaking the lift mechanism or even using a universal garage door remote, new doors come with many redundant security features, which will go a long way in deterring even the most ingenious burglar.
The not-so-competitive advertising trick: How about this racket: We have all heard how you should get at least three bids for any home improvement jobs, right? In some areas the largest ads in the yellow pages are from a single business using various names and phone numbers, masquerading as independent competitors. When you call asking for prices, "they" all quote you very high numbers. You are tricked into thinking you have shopped around for the prevailing price. (The more modern version of this is multiple Web sites that all direct you to call the same person.) If you've ever had to call a plumber you may have unknowingly been a victim of a similar trick.

Since their invention in the 1920s, electric garage door openers have come a long way. Garage door openers work by using a trolley connected to an arm that attaches to the top of the garage door and slides back and forth on a track, which opens and closes the garage door. When operating the motor, a chain or belt turns and pulls the trolley along the track. A good garage door opener will have a horsepower of 1/2 HP, 3/4 HP, or 1-1/4 HP. Garage door openers have the ability to open and close a limited number of times in power outage emergencies. Security is something else to consider when purchasing an opener. It's helpful to have sensors that will stop the operation of the garage door when a person, vehicle, or other obstacle is in the way.

The Certified Technician, Rey Lopez, was competent, professional, polite, and willing to work. He quickly removed the old door and installed the new one. He then explained the vast differences between what we originally had and what we'd just purchased (stronger spring/tension rates; increased viability of door opening/closing life; beefier hardware; plastic vs. nylon rollers; stronger door reinforcement). Ray performed with alacrity his tasks and then demonstrated the quiet, solid way the door retracted--no banging after the initial rise from the ground. Finally, his attention to detail was so precise that he enabled another remote controlling all three doors, plus he capped some frayed wires, thus solving the problem of why the door opened intermittently. I would rate him a "6" on a scale of "1-5", meaning he went above and beyond our expectations. His "can do" attitude, coupled with the deference he showed, will take him a long, long way. May HaShem richly bless him in his endeavors!read more

To make sure the job gets done right, our professional installers are local, licensed and insured. With a 9.7 out of 10 VOC score, our garage installers will exceed your expectations, provide reliable service, and install attractive garage doors that will transform your home’s appearance. All labor, products and installations are 100% backed by The Home Depot. Service you can trust.


One of these "sproing" events at our house finally motivated me to research how these repairs are done. This happened in 2002, when my wife parked the chariot and shut the door. After the door closed, there was a horrific noise that she could only astutely describe as, "a big spring snapping and vibrating". Although I have hired professionals several times in the past to install or repair garage doors, the difference this time was the innovation of Google and newsgroups like alt.home.repair. I was determined to learn the process and to search for online parts vendors.

I was very pleased with the technicians professional demeanor, the advance call, and the promptness of service. I could have done the work myself, but I feel very comfortable with the repair, and due to a recent injury it was just better for me not to climb a ladder. It was money well spent, and the old adage "You get what you pay for" certainly was true in this case.
Unmatched or mismatched spring pair: You may find that you have a pair of springs that are different sizes. This mismatch may be a normal application, since the total torque on the torsion shaft is simply the sum of the torque contribution of each spring (indeed, very large doors can be lifted with 4 or more springs along the torsion shaft). The sum of the torque rates determine the lift; and dividing the torque among multiple springs does not change this. Some repair shops even apply mismatched pairs deliberately, since a few stock sizes of springs can be combined to fit a wider range of door weights than only matched pairs. For example, a technician may carry springs in increments of 20 lbs of lift, and when using pairs this allows a 20 lb increment in possible choices instead of 40 lb increments. Or, one spring from a pair may have broken and been replaced with a spring of equal torque rate but different size than the original.
Step 1: Check the metal tracks inside the garage. Look at the mounting brackets that hold the tracks to the walls. If they're loose, tighten the bolts or screws at the brackets. Working inside the garage with the garage door closed, examine the tracks for dents, crimps, or flat spots. If there are any damaged spots, pound them out with a rubber mallet, or with a hammer and a block of scrap wood. If the tracks are badly damaged, they should be replaced.
Your garage door is most likely the largest opening on your home, and as a result, it can affect your home’s energy efficiency. For homes in areas that experience colder winters or warmer summers, choosing an insulated door can save you money and improve the comfort of your home. Doors insulated with our Intellicore® insulation technology operate more quietly and are more durable. We also offer insulated glass window options that can help maintain energy efficiency and allow natural light into your garage. Visit our insulation guide to learn more about garage door insulation, or learn more about Intellicore® here.
Replace your old garage door and give your home a new look. Make it a custom garage door down to the tiny details. It's easy, fun and you can put together as many as you like before you get the perfect style for your home. Try our online customized garage door selector tool, and you'll have the garage door of your dreams on its way to you in no time. Standard, yet dependable wood-look steel doors, grooved-panel steel doors and classic raised panel steel doors are some of your options. Boost your style with barn garage doors for a unique, old-time yet modern look. Choose from hundreds of garage styles including traditional, carriage house and contemporary. If you spend time in the garage, let some light in, get a garage door with windows. The garage doesn't have to be just for cars, use the space however you need it - a play room for the kids, a workshop for hobbies, a studio. Let fresh air in but keep the bugs out with a garage door screen.
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