Trading wire size for length, diameter, or cycle life: Now we are really going to save you some money, if you just recall your high school algebra class (and I don't mean that cute cheerleader who sat next to you). If you further understand the role of the 4th power of the spring wire size (letter d in the formulas above) in the numerator of the spring rate formula, and how to increase or decrease d to compensate for changes in length, diameter, and cycle life, then you're qualified for elite spring calculations. Matching springs is a matter of equating the 4th power of the proportion in wire size change to the proportion of change in the diameter or length or the product of both diameter and length. However, it is usually best to only increase wire size when substituting a spring, since this does not derate the cycle life. If you observe that the formula for bending stress is proportionate to the inverse 3rd power of the diameter, then physically a proportionate increase in wire size will result in a dramatic increase in cycle life of the 3rd power of that proportion. Trade-off example: Yawn with me while we ponder my original spring once more. Let's say I was in a fit of engineering mania, and wanted to replace my spring having a 0.2253 inch diameter wire (d = 0.2253) with a 0.262 wire version (d = 0.262). How much longer is the spring with equal torque rate, assuming we use the same coil diameter? The proportion of this change is 0.262/0.2253 = 1.163, and the 4th power of that is 1.83. This means the length must increase by a factor of 1.83 (again, not counting dead coils). Recalling that the length in Example 1 was 102 non-dead coils, the heavier wire spring must be about 1.83*102 = 187 coils, which when adding 5 dead coils and multiplying by the wire size to get the overall length, is (187+5)*0.262 = 50 inches, versus 24 inches in the original. So using this heavier wire more than doubles the length (and thus the mass and thus the cost). While the cost about doubles, the stress goes down by the inverse 3rd power of the wire size proportion, or 1/(1.163**3) = 0.64. Sress is favorably, non-linearly related to cycle lifetime (halving the stress more than doubles the lifetime), so this decreased stress should more than double the expected lifetime of the spring. While the up-front cost is more, the true cost of an amortized lifetime is much less. In short, per cycle it is cheaper. Ah, the wonders of engineering calculations! Conclusion: Observe that the stress formula (and thus the cycle lifetime) depends only on wire diameter (d) for equal torques. Thus the only way to improve cycle lifetime is to use heavier wire. For equal torques, heavier wire size, due to the exponents in the formulas, increases cycle lifetime much faster than it increases mass (and thus cost), physically speaking.

The winding technique is simply to (un)wind as far as one rod will go, where it is pressed against the top of the door, or nearly so, by the unwinding torsion. You insert the other rod in the next socket, remove the first rod, and continue. At any point you can stop and rest by leaving the active rod pressed against the door, where it will be held by the unwinding force. I would make a quarter-turn increment that way, and let go for a moment to collect my attention for the next increment, almost in a quiet, meditative alertness. While you can go from one quarter-turn and rod-swap to the next continually without letting go, working fast against the steady tension seemed to invite a kind of shakiness in my arms that was a bit unsettling. It isn't that there is much physical exertion, it is more that the tension is unrelenting, like peering over a precipice.

You might genuinely need some extra parts when you thought you simply needed a broken spring replaced, and a good serviceman will perform a simple inspection to identify such parts. Nor is it unreasonable for a business to charge separately for a service call versus repair work actually performed. But the best protection for you as a buyer, being somewhat at the mercy of whomever you decide to bring on site, is to understand what is being done, and ask intelligently for a clear explanation or demonstration of why extra parts are required.
Dynamic Door Service can install a new garage door replacement for you quickly and efficiently, conducting thorough testing on your garage door replacement and automatic garage door opener to be sure both are functioning properly.  Investing in a garage door replacement also adds value to your home, since it is one of the best home remodelling projects to recoup cost when you sell your home. Whether you need a new automatic garage door, a garage door replacement, garage door repair or garage door opener replacement or repair, call Dynamic Door Service for prompt, professional automatic garage door installation, maintenance and service.
GUESS YOU DON’T CARE to reply to my emails, so I'm posting it up here..... On Sep 8, 2018, at 2:52 PM, Joe Turiczek wrote: Thanks for the invoice, thanks for the service, thanks for the rapid response, thanks for Chris (the tech), but one note….. I’m a really handy guy, I repair and maintain nearly everything around the house, I am very mechanically adept, and I am also a highly skilled technical person that runs my own business by trade. I would have and could have repaired the belt myself, but I am traveling for business sooner than I could have ordered a belt, and did the repair….which means, I looked at the belts, I watched all the videos, it’s an EASY repair. I have belts down to a science, I’m really not an armchair DIY repair guy, I’m pretty good……That being said, I also shopped for prices of new belts for at least 30 mins or better, across easily 20-30 different parts and/or repair websites. Why am I telling you this? Because I think Chris, and your labor prices are spot on, and he deserved every cent, and your labor billing is more than fair…..however, I think your charge for the belt is a bunch of crap, it is nearly double of the HIGHEST price I found, which was $20-$25 higher than the average prices I found. Based on that alone, there is no way I could recommend, your otherwise FANTASTIC service, to anybody I know with a straight face. That’s just me being honest, because that’s who I am.
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You might be thinking: Aha! Why don't we lift the door, clamp it in place, and install the springs while they are thus safely unwound, rather than deal with all that accumulation of hazardous torque? The answer: At the top-of-travel, the unwound springs are not fully relaxed; they are still clamped to the torsion shaft with a significant stretch along the shaft axis, plus about a half-turn to keep the door snug at the top. This extra length amounts to the stacking of extra turns that accumulate from winding, also termed "spring growth" in the business. In my case this is about 7 turns of 0.2253 wire, or about 2 inches. Stretching the spring that much and clamping it with a half-turn or so of twist is not feasible.
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It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, those also happen to be the kinds of days when cold and moisture combine to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button.

If you’re looking for a stylish garage door that is a statement of your good taste, we have customized solutions that fit your family’s lifestyle. Or if it’s the safety and security of an integrated, commercial door and operator system that your workplace needs, Overhead Door™ products make operating your facility safer and easier. Our products are manufactured to give you durable, long-lasting performance for years of extended use and trouble-free operation. Each product, from residential to industrial to commercial applications, is backed by knowledgeable and professional customer support for troubleshooting and answers to your questions.
Since the springs are winding "up" when the door is closing and going down, the fully closed position is the most stressful on the steel and thus the most likely position at the moment of failure. This is a good thing, because failure near the top-of-travel means that you suddenly have a large, increasing weight falling. Thus we see the principle that you should never be standing or walking under the door when it is opening or closing, especially if you do so manually instead of with an electric opener. When the springs are working correctly, the door appears nearly weightless, but this is an illusion that turns into a calamity when the springs suddenly fail.
Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.

The usually recommended rule for a door being properly balanced is that it should lift "easily" through all its travel. The door may also remain stationary if let go somewhere around the middle of the travel, but a smoothly rolling door many not show this behavior (while a sticky track will!), so easy travel is the only reliable test for proper balance. A difficult door may be due to stiff bearings or rollers in the mechanism, tracks out of alignment, etc., not necessarily the torsion spring adjustment.
An enantiomorphic (mirrored) pair of springs, such as my standard door uses, will consist of one left-hand and one right-hand spring. Note that this "right" and "left" has nothing necessarily to do with whether the spring is mounted on the left or right of the center bearing plate. Indeed, with my standard door, if you stand inside the garage, facing out, then the spring to the left is a right-hand-wound spring, and the spring to the right is a left-hand-wound spring. The photos above and below of the broken spring show that it is a right-hand-wound spring.
A torsion spring counterbalance system consists of one or two tightly wound up springs on a steel shaft with cable drums at both ends. The entire apparatus mounts on the header wall above the garage door and has three supports: a center bearing plate with a steel or nylon bearing and two end bearing plates at both ends. The springs themselves consist of the steel wire with a stationary cone at one end and a winding cone at the other end. The stationary cone is attached to the center bearing plate. The winding cone consists of holes every 90 degrees for winding the springs and two set screws to secure the springs to the shaft. Steel counterbalance cables run from the roller brackets at the bottom corners of the door to a notch in the cable drums. When the door is raised, the springs unwind and the stored tension lifts the door by turning the shaft, thus turning the cable drums, wrapping the cables around the grooves on the cable drums. When the door is lowered, the cables unwrap from the drums and the springs are rewound to full tension.[7]
Extension spring systems should always be restrained by a safety cable that runs through the middle of the spring, tying off to a solid point at the rear and front of the horizontal door track. Extension springs represent a hazard to bystanders when a spring, pulley, or cable breaks under tension. Metal parts from extension spring systems can suddenly be launched.
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Fortunately, owners aren't bashful about weighing in on their garage door openers. Though some models get only a handful of reviews others receive hundreds of unique ratings on sites such as Amazon, Home Depot and Lowe's. If you are interested in a Craftsman garage door opener, Sears is the place to visit. While our research reveals that no garage door opener is perfect, several models jump to the fore as offering good performance and good value in the eyes of owners. These are the openers that we've named Best Reviewed for this edition of our report.
The German-made, .75-horsepower (equivalent) Direct Drive 1042V004 garage door opener doesn't use a belt drive or a chain drive. Instead, the mobile motor crawls along a stationary chain, making it exceptionally quiet. This garage door opener is also feature-packed, though the wireless entry keypad is an extra-cost accessory. Reliability is excellent, and installation is at least a little easier than some other garage door openers. This opener is also sold under the Sommer brand and with different model numbers, but all are similar.
Powerful, quiet and durable, Overhead Door® automatic garage door openers are designed for performance. And when you combine an Overhead Door® opener with one of our doors, you get an integrated system that maximizes performance and reliability. Our full line of automatic openers features a variety of power levels and specifications to handle different garage door weights and sizes. Each opener also comes with built-in, standard functions for the ultimate in safety, convenience and power. Don't know which opener to choose? Find the answers to some common questions to make sure you're buying the right garage door opener​. We offer a wide variety of additional garage door opener accessories.​​​
 Technician Mark called 1/2 hr before coming. Very knowledgeable and friendly technician. Originally scheduled as a tune-up but after pointing out several potential problems I decided on the complete overhaul package. All parts were on the truck. Technician completed job in a little over an hour. Very satisfied. Definitely would recommend.Bob PNorth Myrtle Beachread more 

Spring index lower limit: DASMA standard 102-2004 provides a lower limit of 6 for the spring index, which is symbol C in our formulas above (section 9.3). Other interesting items in this standard include an upper limit for how much the door sags when raised (no more than 1/120 of its width, section 9.2.1), that each of the two bottom brackets should sustain twice the door assembly's weight (section 9.2.2) for a total safety factor of about 4, and that the lift cables should provide a safety factor of 5.
The most common grade of torsion springs have an expected life of about 10,000 cycles. The hardened and tempered steel experiences tremendous forces each time the door opens or closes. Gradually, the steel fatigues with each flexure, and eventually cracks and breaks, usually releasing its stored energy in an instant with a horrific "sproing" noise or bang. If you average about two car trips per day, opening and closing the door a total of 4 times daily when you come and go, then that expected life becomes 2500 days, or only about 7 years. If you have an automatic opener, then if you're like me, you tend to cycle the door even more frequently, and can expect the need for spring replacement even sooner. Moreover, my three-car garage has three doors, so on average I can expect a repair job every few years. Over a lifetime, it is very economical to do these repairs myself.

With garage door installation costs, these numbers also include the actual purchase of the new door and other hardware, including the tracks, adhesives, connectors and fasteners. Keep in mind that if these numbers seem extreme, garage door replacement and upgrades can yield, on average, one of the highest returns on investments for homeowners — with an expected 85 percent.
The usually recommended rule for a door being properly balanced is that it should lift "easily" through all its travel. The door may also remain stationary if let go somewhere around the middle of the travel, but a smoothly rolling door many not show this behavior (while a sticky track will!), so easy travel is the only reliable test for proper balance. A difficult door may be due to stiff bearings or rollers in the mechanism, tracks out of alignment, etc., not necessarily the torsion spring adjustment.
First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.

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