The one excuse that makes the most sense is, "if we sell springs to a do-it-yourselfer, and he gets hurt installing it, we could get sued." I can sympathize with someone who wants to sell only to the trade and not bother with the risk of a spurious product liability lawsuit from an ignorant member of the public. But the lawn-mower dealers have figured out how to manage that kind of exposure, so this is not an absolute barrier to retailing garage door parts to the public. It doesn't explain why torsion springs at retail are virtually non-existent.

Thank you for visiting Precision Garage Door Service of Seattle. We specialize in the repair of residential garage doors, openers, sales, service, & installation. Where ever you live along the Wasatch front, You have my personal guarantee that your experience with us will be professionally handled from start to finish. Your service will be provided by qualified & certified technicians that have completed the most extensive & rigorous training in the industry. We are proud of our environmentally sensitive business practices. Please give us a call to discuss your specific needs. We look forward to serving you.
Overhead Door® openers​ and garage doors are built with longevity in-mind. By performing a few routine tasks, you can help ensure your garage door system stays safe and stands the test of time. One important part of garage door system routine maintenance is to make sure the photo-eyes have not gone out of alignment. The photo-eyes are the infrared sensors which monitor whether the space at the bottom of your garage door is clear. When these sensors are not lined up properly they will keep your door from closing. Make sure to occasionally check your photo-eyes’ alignment to ensure they are correctly detecting obstructions to keep your garage door safe and operating properly.
You might be thinking: Aha! Why don't we lift the door, clamp it in place, and install the springs while they are thus safely unwound, rather than deal with all that accumulation of hazardous torque? The answer: At the top-of-travel, the unwound springs are not fully relaxed; they are still clamped to the torsion shaft with a significant stretch along the shaft axis, plus about a half-turn to keep the door snug at the top. This extra length amounts to the stacking of extra turns that accumulate from winding, also termed "spring growth" in the business. In my case this is about 7 turns of 0.2253 wire, or about 2 inches. Stretching the spring that much and clamping it with a half-turn or so of twist is not feasible.

At PK Garage Door, we firmly believe that an installation properly done is the key to a top-performing garage door system. Well-experienced, we understand and follow the highest safety standards in the industry. In addition, Garaga has certified our company as one of their Garaga Expert dealers, which means we meet their strict criteria for technical expertise and professionalism.    
We are proud of the work we do in Northwestern North Carolina. We love this community and we love serving it. So whether you think you need a small repair or a major overhaul, we want to be the team that helps you increase the value of your home while making it a safer place to live for you and your family. Our professional and friendly sales team are eager to connect with you, so contact us today and find out just how we can ease your concerns and make transform your garage!
To estimate the maximum physical force required to wind these springs, consider that they are balancing the weight of the door with a torque applied to a lift drum on each end of the torsion shaft. The lift drums have a 2-inch radius, which is the standard residential size, and corresponds conveniently to about a 1-foot circumference. If we pessimistically assume the 10-by-7-foot door has a weight of 350 pounds, this implies a torque of 350 pounds on a 2-inch radius, that is, 700 inch-pounds, or 58 foot-pounds. Each of the two springs should be exerting slightly less than half of the balancing torque, or 29 foot-pounds. Compare this to, say, the bolts in an automobile, which are typically torqued to values of about 50 foot-pounds, or tire lug nuts, which may be torqued to well over 100 foot-pounds.
Since their invention in the 1920s, electric garage door openers have come a long way. Garage door openers work by using a trolley connected to an arm that attaches to the top of the garage door and slides back and forth on a track, which opens and closes the garage door. When operating the motor, a chain or belt turns and pulls the trolley along the track. A good garage door opener will have a horsepower of 1/2 HP, 3/4 HP, or 1-1/4 HP. Garage door openers have the ability to open and close a limited number of times in power outage emergencies. Security is something else to consider when purchasing an opener. It's helpful to have sensors that will stop the operation of the garage door when a person, vehicle, or other obstacle is in the way.

We provide Garage door service, repair, sales and estimates for the entire Detroit, Michigan Metropolitan area with service to Wayne, Oakland, Washtenaw, Monroe, Livingston and Macomb Counties. This includes: Ann Arbor, Birmingham, Bloomfield Hills, Canton, clawson, Clinton Township, Commerce Township, Dearborn, Dearborn Heights, eastpointe, Farmington Hills, ferndale, Franklin, Fraser, Garden City, Grosse Ile, Livonia, Macomb Township, Milford, Northville, Novi, Plymouth, Rochester, Romulus, Roseville, Royal Oak, Shelby Township, South Lyon, Southfield, Southgate, Sterling Heights, Taylor, Trenton, Troy, Utica, Warren, Wayne, West Bloomfield, Westland, Ypsilanti, MI.
Depending on the design, you can know in advance how many turns are going to have to be unwound. Lifting a 7-foot door by winding a cable on a 4-inch diameter (about 1 foot circumference) drum requires about 7 turns, plus one extra turn to maintain cable tension at the top-of-travel. Maintaining tension at the top-of-travel is critical; without it the cable will jump off the drum, requiring a serious repair.
The most common grade of torsion springs have an expected life of about 10,000 cycles. The hardened and tempered steel experiences tremendous forces each time the door opens or closes. Gradually, the steel fatigues with each flexure, and eventually cracks and breaks, usually releasing its stored energy in an instant with a horrific "sproing" noise or bang. If you average about two car trips per day, opening and closing the door a total of 4 times daily when you come and go, then that expected life becomes 2500 days, or only about 7 years. If you have an automatic opener, then if you're like me, you tend to cycle the door even more frequently, and can expect the need for spring replacement even sooner. Moreover, my three-car garage has three doors, so on average I can expect a repair job every few years. Over a lifetime, it is very economical to do these repairs myself.
Once the springs are torqued, the setscrews tightened, and the locking pliers and winding rods removed, do not play with turning the torsion bar using the winding rods. Doing so even momentarily can relieve the tension on the lift cables, which then easily slip off the drums. Replacing the cables on the drums can be difficult without repeating the entire spring unwinding-winding procedure again, and the cables can be damaged if tension is applied while they are off the drums.
Regardless of the material, you will likely need to perform some regular maintenance tasks. A garage door professional can examine common problem areas to ensure all are working as they should. Additionally, it is necessary to examine the integrity of the door itself, since your garage can be especially vulnerable to security issues if your door is not structurally sound.
Winding "up" starts out easy. It finishes at the proper number of turns, by which time you are pushing against the maximum torque. Count the turns of spring winding from when the springs are slack. To be sure you're winding the right direction, all you have to remember is that proper winding makes the spring smaller in diameter and longer in length as it twists "in". On the standard door (most common), this means you push the winding bars up to wind up the spring, which is an easily remembered rule. This is very apparent and should be verified during the first few easy turns. You can also think about the correct winding direction in mechanical terms, namely which way the reaction of the spring will torque the shaft and drums, which in turn will lift the cable. This should all make perfect sense before you attempt the manipulations.
Now 13 pounds of force must be respected when backed by many hundreds of foot-pounds of stored energy, waiting to be released. Holding this torque is equivalent to stalling a 3 horsepower DC motor. But holding and turning these handles does not require extraordinary human strength. Note that this maximum tangential force depends only on the weight of the door, and the radius of the drums, and is divided by the number of springs (some designs have only one longer spring, as mine did originally, instead of two shorter ones). Higher or lower lift distances imply more or less turns to wind the spring (and thus a different spring geometry), but not more force on each turn.
The Chain Drive Rail Extension Kit for 10'-High The Chain Drive Rail Extension Kit for 10'-High Garage Doors is required for reliable everyday operation of Chamberlain chain drive models in 10-ft. garage door applications. Featuring a quick-install extension rail and replacement chain the kit includes everything needed for quick and easy installation. Includes one-year warranty rail extension replacement ...  More + Product Details Close
Whether you're planning on moving in the future or you're fixing up your forever home, replacing a garage door can provide an excellent return on investment and boost your home's resale value. According to Remodeling magazine's 2016 Cost vs. Value report, garage door upgrades provide a nationwide average return on investment of over 90%, making it one of the top five home improvement projects.
The door and tracks at this stage of the repair are in a minimum-energy condition. This is a good opportunity to work on any hinges, bearings, rollers, cables, or tracks that need tightening, repair, lubrication, or replacement. Again, these parts should be available from the spring source, and should be ordered based on a pre-inspection. Home-improvement stores carry some of these parts, but the type and quality may not be the best.
Garage Door Installation – This includes the installation of a new garage door. Includes the door itself, the track, cables, springs, hinges, handles, locks and rollers. It is the complete service and installation of a new door. We inspect all the parts, make adjustments to fit your garage opening, and service all elements during the installation process. Plus, we check to ensure all parts are in proper working order after installed.
Carriage: These doors mimic the look of doors found on old carriage houses in the days of horses and buggies. Because of their rustic look, they are often favored in the West and Southwest of the United States. The doors swing open like oversized French doors and hang from jambs on hinges. With their unique look, they create an area of visual interest for your home and are quite energy efficient. The downside is they require a considerable amount of clearance to work properly. Because most carriage garage doors are largely composed of wood, you may need to replace deteriorating or rotting door materials. The average cost for carriage garage door repairs is $133.
You might genuinely need some extra parts when you thought you simply needed a broken spring replaced, and a good serviceman will perform a simple inspection to identify such parts. Nor is it unreasonable for a business to charge separately for a service call versus repair work actually performed. But the best protection for you as a buyer, being somewhat at the mercy of whomever you decide to bring on site, is to understand what is being done, and ask intelligently for a clear explanation or demonstration of why extra parts are required.

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