Install the stiffening strut on top of the top section of steel doors with the section lying flat. Then install the opener bracket that replaces the center bracket between the top two sections. While you’re working on the sections, protect them from scratches by putting carpet scraps on top of your sawhorses. Now, slide the rollers into the roller brackets.
Regardless of the material, you will likely need to perform some regular maintenance tasks. A garage door professional can examine common problem areas to ensure all are working as they should. Additionally, it is necessary to examine the integrity of the door itself, since your garage can be especially vulnerable to security issues if your door is not structurally sound.
Your garage door is most likely the largest opening on your home, and as a result, it can affect your home’s energy efficiency. For homes in areas that experience colder winters or warmer summers, choosing an insulated door can save you money and improve the comfort of your home. Doors insulated with our Intellicore® insulation technology operate more quietly and are more durable. We also offer insulated glass window options that can help maintain energy efficiency and allow natural light into your garage. Visit our insulation guide to learn more about garage door insulation, or learn more about Intellicore® here.
Beware of improprer prior installations: Sometimes the existing door installation is not correct, and the old springs should not be used as a specification for replacements. For example, the old springs might have been replaced with incorrect sizes because the last repairman didn't have the right one on his truck. If your door has never worked quite right, something like this might be the cause. To correct this, you must use the weight of the door to specify the spring, either from a spring rate manual giving spring torque constants, or from the formulas below.
I called late on a Monday and was able to get scheduled for 8:00 Tuesday morning. Matt arrived promptly on time and did a thorough assessment of the problem. He explained all my repair options and the advantages of each. I took his advice and opted for the door overhaul, in addition to the logic board replacement. The door was the original and had been installed improperly. There were wrong parts and incorrect assembly. Matt worked diligently to make things right. What was normally a two hour job took four, as he wouldn’t be satisfied with anything less than perfection. He stopped back by late in the afternoon to make sure all adjustments were made correctly. Excellent service, fair price, and explanations of every step in the repair process.read more
Tom was professional, knowledgeable, and very friendly. He arrived at my house within the time frame he said he would (nothing is worse than a late technician). Once he arrived, he assessed the problem, explained it clearly and concisely, and informed me he had the parts available with him to fix it. He fixed the issues speedily and I was able to return to work within the hour. The price was reasonable too. I would recommend Precision to any of my friends and neighbors. Thanks Tom!

One of these "sproing" events at our house finally motivated me to research how these repairs are done. This happened in 2002, when my wife parked the chariot and shut the door. After the door closed, there was a horrific noise that she could only astutely describe as, "a big spring snapping and vibrating". Although I have hired professionals several times in the past to install or repair garage doors, the difference this time was the innovation of Google and newsgroups like alt.home.repair. I was determined to learn the process and to search for online parts vendors.
The typical electric garage door opener consists of a power unit that contains the electric motor. The power unit attaches to a track. A trolley connected to an arm that attaches to the top of the garage door slides back and forth on the track, thus opening and closing the garage door. The trolley is pulled along the track by a chain, belt, or screw that turns when the motor is operated. A quick-release mechanism is attached to the trolley to allow the garage door to be disconnected from the opener for manual operation during a power failure or in case of emergency. Limit switches on the power unit control the distance the garage door opens and closes once the motor receives a signal from the remote control or wall push button to operate the door.[3]
Next, the torsion shaft is reassembled with the new springs, the drums repositioned loosely on the shaft, this whole assembly slid back into the end bearings, and the drum set-screws tightened down. I tightened the set-screws about 1/2 or 3/4 of a turn after contact with the shaft, which provides a good grip, but does not distort the shaft. The drums can be set on their old positions, if they were correctly installed, which is snug up against the end bearings to remove any longitudinal play in the torsion shaft. Now the lift cable can be reattached to the drums, and a slight temporary torque applied to the shaft to keep the cable taut while the first spring is wound. This temporary torque is conveniently applied with a pair of locking pliers clamped on the shaft, positioned such that they hold the torque by pressing lightly against the wall above the door, before you start the spring winding, The locking pliers stay on the torsion shaft until you have finished the spring winding locked down the spring cone(s) with the setscrew(s), and removed the winding bars. Then you simply remove them with the release on the wrench handle. I feel that any job that doesn't require a trick manipulation with either locking pliers or duct tape (or in the ultimate case, both!) is just too boring. My trusty pliers look a trifle rusty ever since I used them to clamp something on my outdoor TV antenna "temporarily" and left them out in the weather for, oh, several years. The white stuff on the drum is paint overspray from the original painting of the garage interior.

Sterling Door is the only company we trust with our garage door. When our old door acted up, springs, track, etc., they were always timely and got the job done. Then when we made the jump to a new door, they were excellent. They helped us choose the right door, not just pushing the most expensive model. And installation was well done. I recommend Sterling Door for all of your garage door needs.
Our technicians are specially trained to handle a variety of garage brands, styles, and configurations. After arriving at your home, a Sears technician will diagnose the problem and walk you through the options for fixing it. Next, the technician will make any necessary adjustments or replace broken parts to ensure the door can be operational once again. We always attempt to complete repairs the same day of service, and your satisfaction is guaranteed. Our representatives are standing by for your call and are happy discuss pricing options.
If you are replacing an old garage door, the first step is to measure your garage opening to ensure you are choosing a door with the correct dimensions. Even if you feel confident that your door is a standard size, measuring first can help ensure that buying your door is an enjoyable and smooth process. View our installation guide to get the needed measurements for your door. If you find that you have an odd-sized garage door, use our QuickDraw tool to see how a specific model will look in your desired size. If you have a unique vision for your home's curb appeal, Clopay can also design custom garage doors to meet your specifications.

Cycle lifetime unchanged by diameter-versus-length tradeoffs: Since the material stress (and thus cycle lifetime) for equal torques varies only with d, and not D or N, trading coil diameter (D) for spring length (N) in this fashion has no effect on cycle lifetime. Long and skinny, versus shorter and fatter, they'll wear the same if they have the same wire size and diameter-length product. The game of life is all about wire size when it comes to springs (see below).
The winding technique is simply to (un)wind as far as one rod will go, where it is pressed against the top of the door, or nearly so, by the unwinding torsion. You insert the other rod in the next socket, remove the first rod, and continue. At any point you can stop and rest by leaving the active rod pressed against the door, where it will be held by the unwinding force. I would make a quarter-turn increment that way, and let go for a moment to collect my attention for the next increment, almost in a quiet, meditative alertness. While you can go from one quarter-turn and rod-swap to the next continually without letting go, working fast against the steady tension seemed to invite a kind of shakiness in my arms that was a bit unsettling. It isn't that there is much physical exertion, it is more that the tension is unrelenting, like peering over a precipice.
Depending on the type and location of the damage you might have an alternative to replacing panels, or entire garage doors. One solution to give new life to your garage door is repair. Small dents, rot, rust or holes can be repair without replacing. Depending on what wrong with the panel, average prices for repair are $130 for steel door repairs, $190 for wood, $170 for aluminum and $150 for fiberglass. Garage door panel repair can save homeowners money, but should be weighed against garage door panel replacment.

The standard winding tools are simply a pair of 18-inch lengths of mild steel rod, 1/2-inch diameter. Winding cones can have different socket sizes (such as 5/8 inch instead of 1/2 inch), so it is important to measure the socket and select a matching rod diameter. Also beware that poor-quality cones may have a sloppy fit to the winding bars, and a loose fit presents a severe hazard of slipping at the worst moment; anything more than about an inch or two of play at the handle end is too loose for safety. I bought a 3-foot length of zinc-plated 1/2-inch diameter steel rod from Home Depot for about $3, which conveniently cuts into two halves of just the right length (the store might even cut it for you if you ask). A steel supplier selling at commodity prices might charge about 50 cents or so for such a piece that weighs about 2 lbs. Drill rod would work if used in the annealed condition in which it is originally sold, but the added expense provides no benefit and the brittleness (if it had been hardened and not annealed) would worry me a bit. Rebar, threaded rod, screwdrivers, etc., are absolutely foolish as they will not fit the socket snugly. Aluminum rod is definitely too weak, and will bend under the torque that must be applied. Longer rods would make for more leverage but unwieldly swing; shorter rods make for uncontrollable swing. As we'll calculate below, the 18-inch standard tool length is an appropriate compromise. Note that you do not need 18 inches of ceiling clearance above the torsion shaft to use an 18-inch rod, since you need not swing the rods above horizontal when winding.


Spring Issues - Unless it is due to an obstruction of some type, uneven movement of your garage door is likely caused by a problem with the spring mechanism. Roll-up doors generally have one center-mounted torsion spring. The tension on torsion springs is great. Therefore, it is necessary to call a professional for any repairs to this type of spring mechanism to avoid serious injury. Because replacement of these springs or cables in a garage door can take at least two or three hours of labor, costs can average $300 or more.
Correct spring size is determined by factors such as the weight and height of the door. You cannot substitute a different spring and just tighten or loosen the winding to make it balance the load. Why? To maintain cable tension under all operating conditions, the spring must retain about one turn of unspent wind-up at the top-of-travel position, which with the lift drum size and door height predetermines the number of turns of winding at the bottom-of-travel; and furthermore the torsion of the fully-wound spring at the bottom-of-travel must be slightly less than that needed to lift the weight of the door when translated by the lift drums.
Scott did an amazing job. Your customer service team is excellent. I emailed late on Thanksgiving night my request for service. Your team called my house within 30 minutes and set up an appointment for the following morning. Scott came out and was great. I had purchased the lifetime warranty package with Precision before, and your team delivered. I highly recommend anyone getting a repair to purchase the lifetime warranty package since your team stands behind your product. Rarely do I write reviews - but am happy to share great information on great companies. Thanks for the great service!
Our value pick is the Chamberlain PD76EV. It costs about $50 less than our top pick, but it has most of the higher-priced model’s advantages. The PD76EV has the same lift capacity, horsepower, lift system and automation compatibility. However, it doesn’t come with advanced features such as a backup power source, close timer and keyless entry pad. If you can live without those, this opener is a great choice.
If this manipulative, we-are-your-nanny business approach is truly in our best interests as consumers, then we shouldn't be allowed near ladders, lawn mowers, or power tools. Those products are just as hazardous and prone to misuse as torsion springs, yet no one thinks of them as forbidden. The only genuine difference is that torsion springs are a hazardous thing you need only rarely, while a lawn mower is a hazardous thing you need all the time.

Spring rate, torque, and lift: The spring rate K for these measurements is π*28.5*10^6 * (0.273)^4 / (32 * 140 * 1.72) = 64.5 IPPT. Applying 7.5 turns on this rate will yield a torque of 7.5 * 64.5 = 484 in-lb, which on the 4-inch drums (2-inch radius) yields a lift of (484 in*lbs)/(2 in) = 242 lbs. Again we find good agreement with the approximate door weight of 238 lbs.
They sent Doug Fussell out to my house on the day after Christmas! I had only called them three days before! Doug was a premier technician, very thorough and very efficient. I expected him to take two days, since he was replacing two doors and adding openers on each door. He only took the daylight hours of one day! I could not believe how fast he was! In addition, he thoroughly taught me how to use the remote openers. I highly recommend them to anyone! 

If your garage door is opening slowly or making a lot of noise, the problem may not be your opener. So before you buy a new one, check for broken or wobbly rollers and brackets. But don’t replace the bottom roller bracket yourself—the cable attached to it is under extreme tension. You’ll need to call a pro. If you’re replacing the rollers, get nylon rollers. They operate quieter than steel rollers and cost only a few bucks more. Next, check the torsion spring (mounted on the header above the door opening) to see if it’s broken. When one breaks, you’ll see a gap in the coils. You’ll need a pro to replace a broken spring.

Garage Door Repair Co

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