Repair of garage doors is a licensed trade in many jurisdictions, and manipulation of the market inevitably follows. Look in your phone book yellow-pages under "garage doors" and you'll find a lot of big, costly ads for door service. The profits are quite juicy, I'm sure. The customers need service urgently, and this need will typically arrive suddenly and at a busy time when shopping for prices is not convenient. A few dollars in parts, an hour of labor and travel, and a $150 invoice (assuming the outfit is charging fairly, some are not). Lately (2006) I hear of outfits charging $200 or $300 for this work, and occasionally a story of a $500 or $800 service call. You'll also find the phonebook advertisers waiting eagerly for your call, because artificially high prices inevitably lead to an oversupply of service firms working under capacity.
Measure springs only when relaxed: Measurements must be taken on a relaxed spring because the winding adds significant overall length while reducing the coiled diameter. If you have a paired design, and one is broken and one is intact, then don't try to measure the length of the intact spring with the door down. A wound spring has 7 or 8 turns adding to the overall length, and will therefore be about 2 inches longer than when relaxed. Measure the lengths of the pieces of the broken spring, which will be unwound, and add them together. As a check, one can measure the length of the intact spring after it is unwound in the procedure to follow below. Be sure also to observe whether the springs are originally of equal sizes, because it is quite possible that they are not.
Modern garage door openers include basic to advanced features that improve safety and deter break-ins. Examples include an automatic stop if a descending door encounters a solid object such as the hood of a car and light beam sensors that detect the presence of an object -- or a person or pet -- and stop a garage door's downward movement before accident or injury can occur. Available security options include remote lockouts for when you will be away from home for an extended amount of time, remote codes that change after each use, and lights that turn on automatically when your garage door opens or if movement is detected inside.
It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, those also happen to be the kinds of days when cold and moisture combine to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button.
We were very pleased with the service we received. The receptionist that took our information over the phone was courteous and efficient. The young man, Nate, who came to the house was on time, respectful of our wants and needs, and very knowledgeable about the job. He was able to fix our door easily. Finally we have a garage door that works with a push of the button! We highly recommend this company for your garage door needs.read more
Removing winding cones from an old broken spring for reuse in a new spring: Springs without the winding cones installed are a little cheaper than with the cones. Twisting the old cones into a new spring is easy with a vise and pipe wrench, but it can be tricky removing old cones from a broken spring for reuse. To remove old cones, mount the cone in a vise such that the spring portion is free. Grab the last few turns of the spring in a pipe wrench, engaging the teeth of the wrench into the end of the spring wire. Turn the wrench against the end of the spring wire, releasing the end of the spring from its clamping onto the cone, as you twist the loosened spring off the cone. Another more certain if not brutal method is to use an angle grinder with a thin metal-cutting disk to cut through the loops of spring wire where the loops wrap around the cones, being careful not to nick the cone itself too much. You could also cut into the old spring loops with a just hacksaw and break off the loops with hand tools, but this will require a lot of effort.
The one excuse that makes the most sense is, "if we sell springs to a do-it-yourselfer, and he gets hurt installing it, we could get sued." I can sympathize with someone who wants to sell only to the trade and not bother with the risk of a spurious product liability lawsuit from an ignorant member of the public. But the lawn-mower dealers have figured out how to manage that kind of exposure, so this is not an absolute barrier to retailing garage door parts to the public. It doesn't explain why torsion springs at retail are virtually non-existent.
We specialize in all varieties of garage door repair work. We have the tools and knowledge to get the job done safely. It can be somewhat dangerous to take on a garage door repair on your own, and most garage door companies will advise against attempting a DIY fix. There are some hazards to watch out for when working around these heavy and high tension doors. We recommend you give the experts at Girard's a call to address the issue in a safe and timely manner.
The standard winding tools are simply a pair of 18-inch lengths of mild steel rod, 1/2-inch diameter. Winding cones can have different socket sizes (such as 5/8 inch instead of 1/2 inch), so it is important to measure the socket and select a matching rod diameter. Also beware that poor-quality cones may have a sloppy fit to the winding bars, and a loose fit presents a severe hazard of slipping at the worst moment; anything more than about an inch or two of play at the handle end is too loose for safety. I bought a 3-foot length of zinc-plated 1/2-inch diameter steel rod from Home Depot for about $3, which conveniently cuts into two halves of just the right length (the store might even cut it for you if you ask). A steel supplier selling at commodity prices might charge about 50 cents or so for such a piece that weighs about 2 lbs. Drill rod would work if used in the annealed condition in which it is originally sold, but the added expense provides no benefit and the brittleness (if it had been hardened and not annealed) would worry me a bit. Rebar, threaded rod, screwdrivers, etc., are absolutely foolish as they will not fit the socket snugly. Aluminum rod is definitely too weak, and will bend under the torque that must be applied. Longer rods would make for more leverage but unwieldly swing; shorter rods make for uncontrollable swing. As we'll calculate below, the 18-inch standard tool length is an appropriate compromise. Note that you do not need 18 inches of ceiling clearance above the torsion shaft to use an 18-inch rod, since you need not swing the rods above horizontal when winding.
To estimate the maximum physical force required to wind these springs, consider that they are balancing the weight of the door with a torque applied to a lift drum on each end of the torsion shaft. The lift drums have a 2-inch radius, which is the standard residential size, and corresponds conveniently to about a 1-foot circumference. If we pessimistically assume the 10-by-7-foot door has a weight of 350 pounds, this implies a torque of 350 pounds on a 2-inch radius, that is, 700 inch-pounds, or 58 foot-pounds. Each of the two springs should be exerting slightly less than half of the balancing torque, or 29 foot-pounds. Compare this to, say, the bolts in an automobile, which are typically torqued to values of about 50 foot-pounds, or tire lug nuts, which may be torqued to well over 100 foot-pounds.
Repair of garage doors is a licensed trade in many jurisdictions, and manipulation of the market inevitably follows. Look in your phone book yellow-pages under "garage doors" and you'll find a lot of big, costly ads for door service. The profits are quite juicy, I'm sure. The customers need service urgently, and this need will typically arrive suddenly and at a busy time when shopping for prices is not convenient. A few dollars in parts, an hour of labor and travel, and a $150 invoice (assuming the outfit is charging fairly, some are not). Lately (2006) I hear of outfits charging $200 or $300 for this work, and occasionally a story of a $500 or $800 service call. You'll also find the phonebook advertisers waiting eagerly for your call, because artificially high prices inevitably lead to an oversupply of service firms working under capacity.

Two of the spring references specifically for the garage-door industry are the APCO Spring Manual by Bill Eichenberger, and the Torsion Spring Rate Book by Clarence Veigel; these give tables of spring sizes and torque constants. Spring engineering principles in general are described in the Handbook of Spring Design published by the Spring Manufacturer's Institute; the formulas allow you to calculate torque constants knowing only the geometry and the Young's modulus of the material. You can also find some brief spring information in standard references like Machinery's Handbook and Marks' Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers.
Horsepower You’ll also want to consider the horsepower of your opener. Typically, 1/2 horsepower will work for most doors in newer homes. If you have a heavier solid wood door, though, you may want to opt for 3/4 horsepower so it can lift it with ease. You can also get 1 and 1 1/2 horsepower models, but those are a better fit for commercial or special situations.
The Genie SilentMax 750 belt drive garage door opener isn't as feature-packed as the Chamberlain B970, but its value is hard to overlook. The 75-HPc motor isn't as strong as the B970s, but is still plenty strong for any residential use, and the opener is widely judged to be pleasingly quiet. Smart features are built in, too, but using those requires the addition of the optional Genie Aladdin Connect module (Est. $95). The biggest downside is that there's no battery back-up.
The Heavy Duty Chain Extension Kit for 8 The Heavy Duty Chain Extension Kit for 8 ft. High Garage Doors is required for reliable everyday operation of Chamberlain heavy duty chain drive models in 8 ft. garage door applications. Featuring a quick-install extension rail and replacement chain the kit includes everything needed for quick and easy installation. Includes ...  More + Product Details Close
The lucky-for-you-I-found-another-problem trick: Another trick is to suggest your automatic opener was damaged (or "compromised") by the additional load or shock presented by the failure of the spring(s). The plastic worm gear used in the most common openers (see above) wears normally over the years and tends to leave a lot of debris inside the opener housing. Removing the opener cover reveals a lot of plastic shavings that may be cited as "evidence" you need a new opener, when the gears are actually still serviceable. Nevertheless, you may have indeed worn out the gear if you repeatedly cycled the door with the opener despite having broken springs, which is possible if you have a very lightweight door.
When garage door repair isn’t an option — perhaps the current door is beyond fixing or you want to upgrade to a quieter, more energy-efficient model — it’s time to buy a new one. But choosing a garage door is not as simple as it sounds, even when you know the right size for your home. A wide range of materials, styles and finishes are available, and each factor influences the cost. Garage doors are made of aluminum, steel, vinyl, fiberglass, masonite, wood (typically cedar or mahogany), or a composite of several materials. They may be insulated against cold or heat. Traditional and modern styles include raised panel, carriage house or crossbuck. Most styles have window or arch options, and are available in different wood finishes and neutral colors. Because garage doors account for a large part of a home’s exterior, their appearance is usually a homeowner’s top priority. An attractive garage door can increase a home’s curb appeal and resale value.
The history of the garage door could date back to 450 BC when chariots were stored in gatehouses, but in the U.S. it arose around the start of the 20th century. As early as 1902, American manufacturers—including Cornell Iron Works—published catalogs featuring a "float over door." Evidence of an upward-lifting garage door can be found in a catalog in 1906.[4]
The electronics should also be inspected before or after investing in the cost of replacing the garage door panel to make sure your door will operate properly. The sensors prevent the door from closing on someone's foot or a pet. If they don't work, someone could be injured. Also check to make sure the door opener works, since you could otherwise be locked out of your garage.
Angle iron provides a stronger installation and reduces vibration, which helps extend the opener’s life span. In an unfinished garage, attach the angle iron directly to the face of a joist with 1-in. lag screws. For finished ceilings, attach angle iron along the bottom of a joist with 3-in. lag screws. Hang the opener using two more lengths of angle iron and nuts and bolts. Use lock washers or thread-locking adhesive to keep vibration from loosening the nuts.
Before purchasing a roll-up door, measure the space between the top of the garage door opening and the ceiling or overhead framing. Standard tracks require headroom of about 14 inches. If you don’t have that, you can get low-headroom track, which costs about $100 more. There are also tracks specially made for garages with unusually high walls or cathedral ceilings.
Thank you for visiting Precision Garage Door Service of Seattle. We specialize in the repair of residential garage doors, openers, sales, service, & installation. Where ever you live along the Wasatch front, You have my personal guarantee that your experience with us will be professionally handled from start to finish. Your service will be provided by qualified & certified technicians that have completed the most extensive & rigorous training in the industry. We are proud of our environmentally sensitive business practices. Please give us a call to discuss your specific needs. We look forward to serving you.
The garage door is the gateway to your home. By choosing an Overhead Door™ residential garage door, you are doing more than making a home improvement investment. You are making us a part of your daily life and relying on us for safety, security and dependable operation. Indulge your sense of design with a garage door that sets your home apart with style, appearance, safety and comfort. With dozens of garage door models to choose from, the Overhead Door™ brand provides style and design options to fit every home. ​
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