The Certified Technician, Rey Lopez, was competent, professional, polite, and willing to work. He quickly removed the old door and installed the new one. He then explained the vast differences between what we originally had and what we'd just purchased (stronger spring/tension rates; increased viability of door opening/closing life; beefier hardware; plastic vs. nylon rollers; stronger door reinforcement). Ray performed with alacrity his tasks and then demonstrated the quiet, solid way the door retracted--no banging after the initial rise from the ground. Finally, his attention to detail was so precise that he enabled another remote controlling all three doors, plus he capped some frayed wires, thus solving the problem of why the door opened intermittently. I would rate him a "6" on a scale of "1-5", meaning he went above and beyond our expectations. His "can do" attitude, coupled with the deference he showed, will take him a long, long way. May HaShem richly bless him in his endeavors!read more
Security Lights: Most newer garage door openers have at least two bright light bulbs, as well as lights activated by motion. On the other hand, some older or cheaper openers are limited to a single light bulb. This doesn't help much with a garage darkened by shadows, leaving you unsure if the rustling in the corner is your cat … or a skunk that snuck into the garage.

If your garage door is opening slowly or making a lot of noise, the problem may not be your opener. So before you buy a new one, check for broken or wobbly rollers and brackets. But don’t replace the bottom roller bracket yourself—the cable attached to it is under extreme tension. You’ll need to call a pro. If you’re replacing the rollers, get nylon rollers. They operate quieter than steel rollers and cost only a few bucks more. Next, check the torsion spring (mounted on the header above the door opening) to see if it’s broken. When one breaks, you’ll see a gap in the coils. You’ll need a pro to replace a broken spring.

Garage Door Repair Co

×