Trading wire size for length, diameter, or cycle life: Now we are really going to save you some money, if you just recall your high school algebra class (and I don't mean that cute cheerleader who sat next to you). If you further understand the role of the 4th power of the spring wire size (letter d in the formulas above) in the numerator of the spring rate formula, and how to increase or decrease d to compensate for changes in length, diameter, and cycle life, then you're qualified for elite spring calculations. Matching springs is a matter of equating the 4th power of the proportion in wire size change to the proportion of change in the diameter or length or the product of both diameter and length. However, it is usually best to only increase wire size when substituting a spring, since this does not derate the cycle life. If you observe that the formula for bending stress is proportionate to the inverse 3rd power of the diameter, then physically a proportionate increase in wire size will result in a dramatic increase in cycle life of the 3rd power of that proportion. Trade-off example: Yawn with me while we ponder my original spring once more. Let's say I was in a fit of engineering mania, and wanted to replace my spring having a 0.2253 inch diameter wire (d = 0.2253) with a 0.262 wire version (d = 0.262). How much longer is the spring with equal torque rate, assuming we use the same coil diameter? The proportion of this change is 0.262/0.2253 = 1.163, and the 4th power of that is 1.83. This means the length must increase by a factor of 1.83 (again, not counting dead coils). Recalling that the length in Example 1 was 102 non-dead coils, the heavier wire spring must be about 1.83*102 = 187 coils, which when adding 5 dead coils and multiplying by the wire size to get the overall length, is (187+5)*0.262 = 50 inches, versus 24 inches in the original. So using this heavier wire more than doubles the length (and thus the mass and thus the cost). While the cost about doubles, the stress goes down by the inverse 3rd power of the wire size proportion, or 1/(1.163**3) = 0.64. Sress is favorably, non-linearly related to cycle lifetime (halving the stress more than doubles the lifetime), so this decreased stress should more than double the expected lifetime of the spring. While the up-front cost is more, the true cost of an amortized lifetime is much less. In short, per cycle it is cheaper. Ah, the wonders of engineering calculations! Conclusion: Observe that the stress formula (and thus the cycle lifetime) depends only on wire diameter (d) for equal torques. Thus the only way to improve cycle lifetime is to use heavier wire. For equal torques, heavier wire size, due to the exponents in the formulas, increases cycle lifetime much faster than it increases mass (and thus cost), physically speaking.


Keep in mind that when the springs are released there is nothing to help with weight replacement. Garage doors weigh 150 pounds or more and if the door were not locked in place, there would need to be some way of holding it up until it can be lower manually. If no one is available to help, a clamp can be put on the track at the end of the door (Image 1). When ready, release the clamp and take the weight of the door.
Garage doors can cost $200 for a single door and up to $4,000 for two doors or more. Keep in mind that better materials will cost more. This price also includes purchase of new tracks, adhesives, connectors and fasteners. You could install the door yourself but the weight of some garage doors are extremely heavy, so make sure you have help if you are trying DIY garage door replacement. Contact a professional or do research online to find out the average weight of different types of garage doors.
The various increments of standard wire sizes differ by only about 0.010 inch, so calipers or a micrometer would be the tool to use to be certain of the stepped size you have, or else a trustworthy ruler marked in tenths of an inch to use the measure-10-turns-and-divide-by-10 trick. The most common wire sizes in the US are 0.207", 0.218", 0.225", 0.234", 0.243", 0.250", and 0.262".
Our garage door installation and repair professionals are courteous, knowledgeable, skilled and dedicated to your satisfaction. Let us show you what we’ve done for so many businesses and homes throughout Cincinnati and northern Kentucky when it comes to their garage doors, and what we can do for you. Once you’ve tried our services, you won’t have to search for a garage door service provider in this area ever again.
The garage door is the gateway to your home. By choosing an Overhead Door™ residential garage door, you are doing more than making a home improvement investment. You are making us a part of your daily life and relying on us for safety, security and dependable operation. Indulge your sense of design with a garage door that sets your home apart with style, appearance, safety and comfort. With dozens of garage door models to choose from, the Overhead Door™ brand provides style and design options to fit every home. ​

Our reviewers tested a top-rated garage door opener daily for over a week. To get the most comprehensive results possible, they installed it themselves and observed how it performed. We asked our testers to consider the most important features when using this garage door opener, from its drive type to its security features. We've outlined the can’t-miss points here so that you, too, know what to look for when shopping.
Note the left winding cone with red spray paint. This shpritz of paint is applied to create fear and doubt in the mind of the do-it-yourselfer. Sometimes it is a color code for the wire size (using a DASMA standard, red indicating 0.2253 inch diameter wire). Sometimes it indicates the winding direction: red may indicate right-hand winding, but don't rely on that; do you own independent analysis. Sometimes it is a manufacturer's private code for another dimension than wire size. This color code is for the installer's information when the spring is new; I would not depend on interpreting the color code properly on an old spring, since one can't be certain of a correct interpretation without documentation from the original supplier.
They sent Doug Fussell out to my house on the day after Christmas! I had only called them three days before! Doug was a premier technician, very thorough and very efficient. I expected him to take two days, since he was replacing two doors and adding openers on each door. He only took the daylight hours of one day! I could not believe how fast he was! In addition, he thoroughly taught me how to use the remote openers. I highly recommend them to anyone!

Most situations allow you to replace spring(s) without removing the assembly from the wall, if there is enough clearance in the surrounding garage structure at the ends of shafts. By unbolting the end bearing plates and removing the drums, you can run the springs down to the ends of the shaft to remove and replace the springs. This avoids the balancing act of holding a long, wobbly, heavy shaft while climbing up and down a ladder. This is how the professionals get the job done in a few minutes.
Install the vertical roller tracks first by wrapping the curved lip around the rollers. The top of these tracks should be approximately 8 in. below the top of the top section. Wait to install the upper tracks until this step is complete. Check the level of the top section to make sure the tops of the vertical roller tracks are level with each other. The bottom of the roller tracks should be at least 1/8 in. off the concrete floor. After leveling and mounting these tracks, install the upper roller (horizontal) tracks.

Speed of a falling door:: Physics tells us that the transit time of a free-falling body is sqrt(2x/g), where x is the length of the fall and g is the acceleration due to gravity (32.2 ft/sec^2). If this typical 150 lb door were to fall an equivalent of 3.75 feet, this falling time would be sqrt(2*3.75/32.2) = 0.48 seconds (480 milliseconds). The terminal velocity is gt, or 0.48 seconds * 32.2 ft/sec^2 = 15.5 ft/sec = 10.6 mph.


Your ad had no cheap coupons or promises.. Just business. Service was more than prompt. No attempt to fix something that was not broke or did not try to sell me anything I did not need. He stated the price at the beginning and stuck to it. (I was so pleased, I did not bother to mention a senior discount.) Very, very pleased that I have found someone I can trust and rely on. GaryRichard

Repair Sagging Garage Doors – As doors and homes age, they can shift and move and sometimes this results in a garage door that needs to be realigned or reinforced. We will send a technician to your home to adjust the doors and to inspect the entire opening to make sure the door isn’t damaged. Once we understand the problem, we will fix the needed parts and make any adjustments to the door.
The Genie Universal Dual Frequency Remote Conversion/Upgrade Kit The Genie Universal Dual Frequency Remote Conversion/Upgrade Kit includes one 3-button compact remote one receiver one transformer and electrical wire (two-wire). The kit alleviates frequency issues from the recently implemented Land Mobile Radio communication system used by military bases as part of the Homeland Security efforts.  More + Product Details Close
×