Winding "up" starts out easy. It finishes at the proper number of turns, by which time you are pushing against the maximum torque. Count the turns of spring winding from when the springs are slack. To be sure you're winding the right direction, all you have to remember is that proper winding makes the spring smaller in diameter and longer in length as it twists "in". On the standard door (most common), this means you push the winding bars up to wind up the spring, which is an easily remembered rule. This is very apparent and should be verified during the first few easy turns. You can also think about the correct winding direction in mechanical terms, namely which way the reaction of the spring will torque the shaft and drums, which in turn will lift the cable. This should all make perfect sense before you attempt the manipulations.

Bringing simple convenience to your home the Chamberlain Bringing simple convenience to your home the Chamberlain 1-1/4 HP Garage Door Opener provides instant garage access at your fingertips. Featuring innovative built-in smartphone control and battery backup this system ensures that you're never locked out of your home. Boasting a steel reinforced belt drive the B970 features anti-vibration technology ...  More + Product Details Close


Current data from real estate firms throughout the country show that replacing the garage door raises the value of a home by an average of $2,810, according to Remodeling Magazine's report. Based on the average cost of $3,304, this means that replacing a garage door is expected to return 85 percent of the job’s cost, nationally. When replacing a garage door in the Western U.S., however, the return is predicted to be 110.8 percent of your investment.
Cable fail-safe redundancy: Based on the proper setting of the drums on the torsion shaft, the two lift cables divide the lifting force equally to keep the door level as it rises. This not only levels the door, but also provides a fail-safe mechanism. If one of the cables should fail, such as from breaking or losing its end attachment, the other cable will then carry the full weight of the door. This will pull the door up on one side with twice the normal force, while the other side falls from its now unsupported weight, tending to make the door bind in its tracks and jam. Although not foolproof, this is a safety feature of the design which keeps the door from falling catastrophically if a cable were to fail while the door was traveling. The jammed condition also prevents a lowered door from opening with the hazard of a single broken cable, further minimizing the chances of both cables failing. Since if one cable fails the other must sustain the full weight of the door, the cables and attachments are rated many times the normal working load of half the door weight. A proper safety inspection of the door should include a critical look at the cables and their attachments.
Most doors come with electric door openers. After a while these openers malfunction and need to be replaced. If your opener is broken, you're in luck. These repairs don't cost very much and can be replaced easily. You might even be able to do it yourself. Learn how to replace your garage door opener in 15 minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeaR6Yhx6IY.
The standard winding tools are simply a pair of 18-inch lengths of mild steel rod, 1/2-inch diameter. Winding cones can have different socket sizes (such as 5/8 inch instead of 1/2 inch), so it is important to measure the socket and select a matching rod diameter. Also beware that poor-quality cones may have a sloppy fit to the winding bars, and a loose fit presents a severe hazard of slipping at the worst moment; anything more than about an inch or two of play at the handle end is too loose for safety. I bought a 3-foot length of zinc-plated 1/2-inch diameter steel rod from Home Depot for about $3, which conveniently cuts into two halves of just the right length (the store might even cut it for you if you ask). A steel supplier selling at commodity prices might charge about 50 cents or so for such a piece that weighs about 2 lbs. Drill rod would work if used in the annealed condition in which it is originally sold, but the added expense provides no benefit and the brittleness (if it had been hardened and not annealed) would worry me a bit. Rebar, threaded rod, screwdrivers, etc., are absolutely foolish as they will not fit the socket snugly. Aluminum rod is definitely too weak, and will bend under the torque that must be applied. Longer rods would make for more leverage but unwieldly swing; shorter rods make for uncontrollable swing. As we'll calculate below, the 18-inch standard tool length is an appropriate compromise. Note that you do not need 18 inches of ceiling clearance above the torsion shaft to use an 18-inch rod, since you need not swing the rods above horizontal when winding.

The optician's trick: The serviceman looks over your door with lots of scowling, chin-scratching, and tsk-tsking. You ask, "how much?" He replies with the fair price. If you don't flinch at that price, he says, "for the parts", while quoting a large additional cost for the labor. If you still don't flinch, he adds, "each," while pointing back and forth to your pair of springs. (I hope none of you service people are reading this!) I call this the "optician's trick" after the old vaudeville joke about lenses, frames, and left/right.


Go for the look of wood with less upkeep with low-maintenance faux wood composite & steel garage doors from our Canyon Ridge® & Coachman® Collections. Our Gallery, and Classic Collection garage doors are also available with Ultra-Grain®, a wood look durable paint. If you’re looking for a more traditional look, our Classic™ Collection of steel raised panel and flush panel garage doors complement most home styles. Add one of our many decorative window options to customize the door's appearance and let natural light into your garage.
If you haven’t looked at garage doors lately, prepare to be pleasantly surprised. We’ve taken the garage door and made it stylish with designs to complement both classic and contemporary homes while still keeping the functionality you desire. A garage door can represent more than 30% of your home’s curb appeal, which makes choosing the right design especially important – and Home Depot has the widest selection available. With over 1,000 different garage door designs in wood, steel, composite, aluminum and glass, you’re sure to find the perfect style to transform your garage… and your home.
Capable of lifting a seven-foot garage door up to 500 pounds in weight, the SilentMax 750 comes with a number of convenience features for automatic and remote use. The included wireless keypad and dual remote controls will ​insure that you are the only one that has access to the door. Compatible with a number of in-car remote systems like HomeLink, you can also keep the remotes at home if you are worried about losing the “keys.”​
Garage doors are usually located in the home exteriors. As a result, they are directly impacted by the forces of nature causing damage and deterioration of the doors over a period of time. We are specialists of garage doors and know how to handle damaged garage doors in the best possible manner. Professionals in our team have complete knowledge on repair of garage doors and they implement the same in providing the best services to our customers in San Antonio and surrounding areas. We can assure of fixing your garage door problems promptly and that too at the most affordable rates!
Looking for another budget option? This one, also from Chamberlain, is a good choice. With a powerful ½ horsepower motor, it’s reliable and rugged, especially paired with its industrial strength chain drive. The 100-watt bulb gives you some overhead light that guides you into your home from your car safely. It also comes with a pre-programmed, one-button remote that can be used over a long range. Plus, there are safety sensors that project an invisible beam helping to prevent the door closing on people or objects. And when the door is closed, you can rest assured it’ll stay closed and locked thanks to its Patented Security + 2.0 rolling code technology and PosiLock anti-theft protection.
Center and level the first section after you install the brackets. The door must be level even if the floor isn’t, so use shims under the section to level it. The rubber gasket on the bottom section will fill the gaps created by an unlevel floor. To hold the level in place, tape it to the section. To hold the section in place, lightly toenail a 16d nail into the frame and bend it over the section. Add brackets and rollers before setting them in place and stack one section on top of another, toenailing as you go up.
The technician, Robert Helton, was very pleasant, helpful, and professional. He repaired the garage door opener expeditiously and explained why it hadn't worked properly. He also checked the chain mechanism and the door itself and showed me how to manually work the door should I need to do that in the future. I was very pleased with this repair work.

Prices, like the garage doors themselves, run the gamut. You can pay as little as $400 for a door that you install yourself, or several thousand dollars for a high-end premium door that includes all the bells and whistles, including installation. A mid-range, 16-by-7-foot door will typically cost from $750 to $1,500, installed. Premium insulated steel doors run from $750 to $3,500. According to Remodeling Magazine’s 2017 Cost vs. Value report, the average national cost of a garage door replacement is $3,304.
Loosening or tightening the set-screws is the moment of most risk, since the end-wrench is a potential missile if you slip, and your hand is close to the cone. When the wrench is removed and only the rods are in place, it would seem that the worst that could happen is that the rod is flung out and the captive spring and cone rattle around, assuming you are keeping yourself clear of the rod's radial disk of rotation, and not leaning on the rod such as to fall into the apparatus were the rod to slip out of your grasp. The torsion shaft design has the virtue of capturing the mass of the spring and cones reliably on the shaft, preventing these parts from launching themselves as projectiles, even in an accident.
Once the shaft, springs, and center bearing plate come down and lay on the floor, the old springs should be easy to get off and new ones slid on and assembled. Two bolts hold the center cones to the center bearing plate. The bearing on the center plate can be oiled while it is exposed from having the springs off. At this point it is a relief to be working with inert parts while standing on the floor rather than energized parts while up on the ladder. You might think it would save a little time to replace the spring with the shaft left up on the wall, but I found it was easier and safer to lower the works down to the garage floor first.
As in an elevator, the electric motor does not provide most of the power to move a heavy garage door. Instead, most of door's weight is offset by the counterbalance springs attached to the door. (Even manually operated garage doors have counterbalances; otherwise they would be too heavy for a person to open or close them.) In a typical design, torsion springs apply torque to a shaft, and that shaft applies a force to the garage door via steel counterbalance cables. The electric opener provides only a small amount of force to control how far the door opens and closes. In most cases, the garage door opener also holds the door closed in place of a lock.

Today's garage doors come with those door sensors, and if anything is in the path of the door the sensor detects it and raises the door back to the open position. These precautions are important for families with young children or pets. Even if you don't have a mini me or furry friend running around your yard, it's a good idea to have a garage door that is safe for you, your guests and your belongings. 
In 1921, C.G Johnson invented the upward-acting garage door and revolutionized the way the world entered their homes. For more than 97 years, Overhead Door™ garage doors have been securing and providing families access to their homes. Overhead Door™ garage doors are assembled in the United States and sold at over 450 authorized Ribbon Distributors throughout North America. The Overhead Door™ brand and Overhead Door™ distributors are synonymous with quality and dependability. To ensure you are getting the genuine, the original, make sure to always look for the Red Ribbon.
×