Trading wire size for length, diameter, or cycle life: Now we are really going to save you some money, if you just recall your high school algebra class (and I don't mean that cute cheerleader who sat next to you). If you further understand the role of the 4th power of the spring wire size (letter d in the formulas above) in the numerator of the spring rate formula, and how to increase or decrease d to compensate for changes in length, diameter, and cycle life, then you're qualified for elite spring calculations. Matching springs is a matter of equating the 4th power of the proportion in wire size change to the proportion of change in the diameter or length or the product of both diameter and length. However, it is usually best to only increase wire size when substituting a spring, since this does not derate the cycle life. If you observe that the formula for bending stress is proportionate to the inverse 3rd power of the diameter, then physically a proportionate increase in wire size will result in a dramatic increase in cycle life of the 3rd power of that proportion. Trade-off example: Yawn with me while we ponder my original spring once more. Let's say I was in a fit of engineering mania, and wanted to replace my spring having a 0.2253 inch diameter wire (d = 0.2253) with a 0.262 wire version (d = 0.262). How much longer is the spring with equal torque rate, assuming we use the same coil diameter? The proportion of this change is 0.262/0.2253 = 1.163, and the 4th power of that is 1.83. This means the length must increase by a factor of 1.83 (again, not counting dead coils). Recalling that the length in Example 1 was 102 non-dead coils, the heavier wire spring must be about 1.83*102 = 187 coils, which when adding 5 dead coils and multiplying by the wire size to get the overall length, is (187+5)*0.262 = 50 inches, versus 24 inches in the original. So using this heavier wire more than doubles the length (and thus the mass and thus the cost). While the cost about doubles, the stress goes down by the inverse 3rd power of the wire size proportion, or 1/(1.163**3) = 0.64. Sress is favorably, non-linearly related to cycle lifetime (halving the stress more than doubles the lifetime), so this decreased stress should more than double the expected lifetime of the spring. While the up-front cost is more, the true cost of an amortized lifetime is much less. In short, per cycle it is cheaper. Ah, the wonders of engineering calculations! Conclusion: Observe that the stress formula (and thus the cycle lifetime) depends only on wire diameter (d) for equal torques. Thus the only way to improve cycle lifetime is to use heavier wire. For equal torques, heavier wire size, due to the exponents in the formulas, increases cycle lifetime much faster than it increases mass (and thus cost), physically speaking.

Our knowledgeable, dependable and friendly team of professionals can work closely with you to select, design and install a quality garage door that best serves your daily needs, enhances the architecture of your home and fits your budget. The extensively trained and experienced technicians at Kitsap Garage Door can help you with any of your garage door service needs, large or small, and are ready to repair any garage door make or model.

We are proud of the work we do in Northwestern North Carolina. We love this community and we love serving it. So whether you think you need a small repair or a major overhaul, we want to be the team that helps you increase the value of your home while making it a safer place to live for you and your family. Our professional and friendly sales team are eager to connect with you, so contact us today and find out just how we can ease your concerns and make transform your garage!


The classic telephone bait-and-switch: This time-honored swindle, also called "false advertising", can show up in the garage door business. Here's how this scam works: When you call and say you have a broken spring, and ask for a repair price, you are told over the phone that the price is X dollars, which typically might seem a little better than the competition. When the repairman shows up, after looking at your broken door, he will casually and matter-of-factly tell you it will cost 2X. If they told you over the phone that it would cost X, well, that was only for one spring, and he must (he must, mind you) install not just one, but two. He will act surprised if you object, as if you should have known that from what you were told over the phone. If you expected to really pay just X, it was your fault for misunderstanding because you don't know anything about how garage doors should be repaired. (You will feel intimidated at this, since you honestly don't know anything, else why would you have called a repairman? Intimidation is a powerful tool against customer resistance.) If your door used only one spring to start with, he will insist on converting yours to two, telling you it is safer the next time a spring breaks. If you originally had two springs, he will tell you that he must replace both springs, and you must therefore pay double what was quoted. While it is true that converting or replacing both springs is a good idea, the bait-and-switch pricing is not. The "bait" is the low price quoted to you over the phone, which they never intended to honor, and the "switch" is switching the price to something higher on a pretense. This method of selling is literally criminal (for example, see Florida Statutes 817.44, all states have similar laws), but a service business can usually avoid detection or prosecution because there are no printed advertisements or other tangible evidence, just one-on-one phone calls. If you find yourself in the middle of this trap, then the proper response is to dismiss the repairman without paying a nickel. Don't expect that you will be able to negotiate a fair price with someone who is using criminal business methods. Certainly don't expect that he will accept a lower price because you accuse him of false advertising. If you absolutely cannot wait for another service call, then you'll have to accept the fraud, in which case you should do so quietly. People that use these methods typically have ways to mentally justify their behavior to themselves as a reasonable business practice, and won't react well to your suggesting otherwise, even though they are in fact small-time criminals, not shrewd businessmen.

The Certified Technician, Rey Lopez, was competent, professional, polite, and willing to work. He quickly removed the old door and installed the new one. He then explained the vast differences between what we originally had and what we'd just purchased (stronger spring/tension rates; increased viability of door opening/closing life; beefier hardware; plastic vs. nylon rollers; stronger door reinforcement). Ray performed with alacrity his tasks and then demonstrated the quiet, solid way the door retracted--no banging after the initial rise from the ground. Finally, his attention to detail was so precise that he enabled another remote controlling all three doors, plus he capped some frayed wires, thus solving the problem of why the door opened intermittently. I would rate him a "6" on a scale of "1-5", meaning he went above and beyond our expectations. His "can do" attitude, coupled with the deference he showed, will take him a long, long way. May HaShem richly bless him in his endeavors!read more
Since the springs are winding "up" when the door is closing and going down, the fully closed position is the most stressful on the steel and thus the most likely position at the moment of failure. This is a good thing, because failure near the top-of-travel means that you suddenly have a large, increasing weight falling. Thus we see the principle that you should never be standing or walking under the door when it is opening or closing, especially if you do so manually instead of with an electric opener. When the springs are working correctly, the door appears nearly weightless, but this is an illusion that turns into a calamity when the springs suddenly fail.
Nate was very polite and knowledgeable about our garage door dilemma. He was prompt and earlier than the appointed time. He phoned ahead to alert us of his approximate arrival. He assessed the situation and gave us options to choose from. He educated us about our type of garage door and the opener that is typically used with it. He basically did an overall replacement of all moving parts, (spring, cables, bearings etc..). He made sure that the opener wasn’t damaged in any way from the broken spring on the garage door. He was finished within the hour. Everything works great and we are now able to get our vehicles out. When the spring breaks on your garage door, there is no way you can lift this door. It was a little expensive but at least we didn’t have to buy an entire door assembly.read more
Bringing simple convenience to your home the Chamberlain Bringing simple convenience to your home the Chamberlain 1-1/4 HP Garage Door Opener provides instant garage access at your fingertips. Featuring innovative built-in smartphone control and battery backup this system ensures that you're never locked out of your home. Boasting a steel reinforced belt drive the B970 features anti-vibration technology ...  More + Product Details Close
First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.

You might genuinely need some extra parts when you thought you simply needed a broken spring replaced, and a good serviceman will perform a simple inspection to identify such parts. Nor is it unreasonable for a business to charge separately for a service call versus repair work actually performed. But the best protection for you as a buyer, being somewhat at the mercy of whomever you decide to bring on site, is to understand what is being done, and ask intelligently for a clear explanation or demonstration of why extra parts are required.
Sterling Door is the only company we trust with our garage door. When our old door acted up, springs, track, etc., they were always timely and got the job done. Then when we made the jump to a new door, they were excellent. They helped us choose the right door, not just pushing the most expensive model. And installation was well done. I recommend Sterling Door for all of your garage door needs.
Called for an appointment and was surprised that I could have a tech come the same day. Matt arrived ahead of schedule, inspected the garage door and gave me a tune up to get things working properly again. He explained what would need to be done in the future, and the cost. I will certainly call them when the time comes to get that work done.read more

Since the springs are winding "up" when the door is closing and going down, the fully closed position is the most stressful on the steel and thus the most likely position at the moment of failure. This is a good thing, because failure near the top-of-travel means that you suddenly have a large, increasing weight falling. Thus we see the principle that you should never be standing or walking under the door when it is opening or closing, especially if you do so manually instead of with an electric opener. When the springs are working correctly, the door appears nearly weightless, but this is an illusion that turns into a calamity when the springs suddenly fail.


Since the springs are winding "up" when the door is closing and going down, the fully closed position is the most stressful on the steel and thus the most likely position at the moment of failure. This is a good thing, because failure near the top-of-travel means that you suddenly have a large, increasing weight falling. Thus we see the principle that you should never be standing or walking under the door when it is opening or closing, especially if you do so manually instead of with an electric opener. When the springs are working correctly, the door appears nearly weightless, but this is an illusion that turns into a calamity when the springs suddenly fail.
Angle iron provides a stronger installation and reduces vibration, which helps extend the opener’s life span. In an unfinished garage, attach the angle iron directly to the face of a joist with 1-in. lag screws. For finished ceilings, attach angle iron along the bottom of a joist with 3-in. lag screws. Hang the opener using two more lengths of angle iron and nuts and bolts. Use lock washers or thread-locking adhesive to keep vibration from loosening the nuts.
First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.
Overhead Door™ products automatically include the unequaled expertise of Overhead Door™ Distributors. Combined with our innovative product design and manufacturing superiority, our distributors are a proud part of the family, sharing our name, Red Ribbon logo, and commitment to excellence. Our network of more than 400 Overhead Door™ D​istributors ensures you have convenient access to our commercial doors and operators, residential garage doors and openers, and accessories wherever you are. This extensive distribution network is unique in our industry, providing a single source for personalized design and application consulting, quick installation, turnkey services and professional maintenance.
Kevin gave 30 mins advance notice via text before arriving, and he was very friendly and knowledgeable about the Chamberlain garage door opener that we ordered on Amazon. I was pleased with the thorough model description provided, and customer reviews which helped with our decision making, and our package came on the same day that it was ordered! I liked the process of choosing 3 preferred appointment times, and receiving a confirmation email which included Kevin's picture. The install price was very reasonable, and I would gladly use your Home Service again!
Here's a view of my door and its broken torsion spring. This door is 10 feet wide and 7 feet high, constructed of 3/4 thick hollow wood panels inside with 3/4 inch plywood siding outside to match the house exterior. This is original to the house which was constructed in 1978, and is much heavier (238 pounds, as I measured later as described below) than the steel doors most common today in new construction. The 10-foot width is a little larger than usual for a one-car garage; such doors are typically only 7 or 9 feet wide. The ceiling height is 9 feet, providing 18 inches clearance above the torsion shaft. This is in a 3-car garage with 3 separate extra-wide doors. Every man's dream! ('cept when the door is broke.)
While winding or unwinding, one must be mindful of the possibility that the spring could break during winding process itself. If that should happen while the spring is significantly torqued, hazardous forces on the winding bar will suddenly become unbalanced, and the bar will take an unexpected jump, possibly injuring your hand or anything else in its path. At the same time, the spring remnants, although captured on the torsion bar, will create a frightening racket that would give the bravest soul a start. So your winding technique should be firmly in control of the rods, and you should not be so delicately perched on a ladder such that a startle will result in a fall.
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In the market for overhead garage doors? Browse our selection of Pella garage doors. You'll find many options for single garage doors, double garage doors, insulated garage doors and even roll up garage doors. Lowe’s also carries garage door screens—great for those who love to spend hours in the garage, but don’t want to deal with the bugs and pests that invite themselves in. We also carry garage door hardware, garage door springs, garage door decorative hardware and garage door sensors, and don’t forget to ask about our garage door installation and garage door opener installation. Once you've decided a garage door fits your home, you'll need to find the garage door opener that works best for you. At Lowe’s, we carry Genie garage door openers, Chamberlain garage door openers and SOMMER garage door openers that will work seamlessly with your garage doors. We now offer a garage door opener that's compatible with your Iris home automation system, too. Whether you prefer opening your garage with a garage door remote or garage door keypad, you'll find it at Lowe’s. Our selection of garage remotes includes everything from universal garage door remotes to specific brands like Chamberlain garage door opener remotes and Chamberlain garage door keypads. We also carry backup batteries, nylon garage door rollers, garage door parts, garage door opener parts and rail extensions to make sure your garage door is in good working order. Plus, we even offer garage door installations services, which include garage door spring repair and replacements, and garage door cable repair and replacements. We can also replace your garage door weather seal, also known as garage door threshold seals, and install a new garage door opener battery.
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