With over 300 independently moving parts, your garage door is a deceptively complex piece of equipment. To help prevent malfunctions and break-downs, it is a good idea to occasionally perform a garage door tune-up to keep all of these parts in good working order. A regular tune-up service by a Sears professional can prevent unexpected door problems and prolong the life of your existing equipment.
Critical measurements: Torsion springs come a variety of standardized sizes, so you have to carefully measure the old springs to know what to order for proper replacements. Tables of standard sizes and designs are on the Web, such as here [www.industrialspring.com]. The four critical measurements (all in inches) are: (1) the wire thickness (which I'm measuring here with a dial caliper; you can also measure the length of a number of closely stacked turns with a ruler and divide by the number of turns in the stack, measuring 10 turns this way makes the math easy), (2) the inside diameter (not outside!) of the relaxed (not wound!) coil, (3) the overall length of the relaxed (not wound!) spring coils, not including the winding cones, and (4) the right- or left-hand winding of the spring. One must glibly quote those figures to the spring supplier, otherwise one's lack of expertise will be obvious, and one will not be worthy of buying the parts.

The usually recommended rule for a door being properly balanced is that it should lift "easily" through all its travel. The door may also remain stationary if let go somewhere around the middle of the travel, but a smoothly rolling door many not show this behavior (while a sticky track will!), so easy travel is the only reliable test for proper balance. A difficult door may be due to stiff bearings or rollers in the mechanism, tracks out of alignment, etc., not necessarily the torsion spring adjustment.
For most homeowners, the garage also functions as the primary entrance to their house. With repetitive daily use, your garage door can experience normal wear and tear and require professional attention. The trained and experienced technicians at Kitsap can help you with any repair needs you may have and will expertly service any garage door brand or type.

The best garage door openers have a lifetime warranty on their motor and belt or chain. While it’s common for motors to come with lifetime warranties, belt and chain and parts warranties are often not that generous. However, it’s not uncommon for parts warranties to extend several years. Often the warranties are limited and subject to specific stipulations that vary and are detailed in the user manuals.
Trading wire size for length, diameter, or cycle life: Now we are really going to save you some money, if you just recall your high school algebra class (and I don't mean that cute cheerleader who sat next to you). If you further understand the role of the 4th power of the spring wire size (letter d in the formulas above) in the numerator of the spring rate formula, and how to increase or decrease d to compensate for changes in length, diameter, and cycle life, then you're qualified for elite spring calculations. Matching springs is a matter of equating the 4th power of the proportion in wire size change to the proportion of change in the diameter or length or the product of both diameter and length. However, it is usually best to only increase wire size when substituting a spring, since this does not derate the cycle life. If you observe that the formula for bending stress is proportionate to the inverse 3rd power of the diameter, then physically a proportionate increase in wire size will result in a dramatic increase in cycle life of the 3rd power of that proportion. Trade-off example: Yawn with me while we ponder my original spring once more. Let's say I was in a fit of engineering mania, and wanted to replace my spring having a 0.2253 inch diameter wire (d = 0.2253) with a 0.262 wire version (d = 0.262). How much longer is the spring with equal torque rate, assuming we use the same coil diameter? The proportion of this change is 0.262/0.2253 = 1.163, and the 4th power of that is 1.83. This means the length must increase by a factor of 1.83 (again, not counting dead coils). Recalling that the length in Example 1 was 102 non-dead coils, the heavier wire spring must be about 1.83*102 = 187 coils, which when adding 5 dead coils and multiplying by the wire size to get the overall length, is (187+5)*0.262 = 50 inches, versus 24 inches in the original. So using this heavier wire more than doubles the length (and thus the mass and thus the cost). While the cost about doubles, the stress goes down by the inverse 3rd power of the wire size proportion, or 1/(1.163**3) = 0.64. Sress is favorably, non-linearly related to cycle lifetime (halving the stress more than doubles the lifetime), so this decreased stress should more than double the expected lifetime of the spring. While the up-front cost is more, the true cost of an amortized lifetime is much less. In short, per cycle it is cheaper. Ah, the wonders of engineering calculations! Conclusion: Observe that the stress formula (and thus the cycle lifetime) depends only on wire diameter (d) for equal torques. Thus the only way to improve cycle lifetime is to use heavier wire. For equal torques, heavier wire size, due to the exponents in the formulas, increases cycle lifetime much faster than it increases mass (and thus cost), physically speaking.

The best garage door openers can be controlled from a remote location through your phone. If you’ve ever left home and had a moment of panic, not knowing if you left the garage door open, this feature can give you peace of mind. The door opener’s built-in Wi-Fi connects directly with your home Wi-Fi router, which allows you to close your garage door from wherever you are through a MyQ smartphone app. The Chamberlain Group opener has this feature – it’s a 1-horsepower garage door opener with extra lifting power for unusually heavy doors of over 500 pounds.


A knowledgeable installer with good inventory can offer you upgraded spring lifetimes by using longer, heavier springs than were originally installed. For example, you may be offered more expensive springs with expected lifetimes of 15, 25, or even 100 thousand cycles, instead of the standard 10 thousand. The difference in labor to substitute this upgrade is nil. Since the dealer's cost of springs is proportional to weight, and typically a small part of the job price anyway, the dealer's cost for this upgrade is slight. This would seem to be a excellent option to offer every customer, and if correctly calculated and reasonably priced, one that you should take as cost-effective. Yet you may not be offered such an upgrade, if the installer is not adept at making the rather simple calculations, or if the optional springs are not on his truck, or if you're not around to be asked, or if the installer just doesn't like selling or taking time to discuss such details.
The most common problem with garage door openers is the door reversing when it’s closing, even when there’s nothing obvious obscuring the photoelectric eyes. If your closing force is adjusted correctly, then the problem is almost always the photoelectric eyes. The eyes are very sensitive— even cobwebs can interfere with them. First make sure the eyes are still in alignment (some- thing may have knocked them out of whack). Then make sure the eyes are clean and the path between them is clear. Finally, look for loose wires in the eyes and the opener.
Given the complexity of a garage door and opener system, there are a variety of different areas something could go wrong. If your garage door shakes or is very loud during operation, the garage door closes all the way only to immediately open back up, the garage door opens slowly or closes too quickly, or the garage door opener and remote aren't working at all, you should seek help from a professional garage door repair specialist.
Most doors come with electric door openers. After a while these openers malfunction and need to be replaced. If your opener is broken, you're in luck. These repairs don't cost very much and can be replaced easily. You might even be able to do it yourself. Learn how to replace your garage door opener in 15 minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeaR6Yhx6IY.

Most garage door openers are pretty expensive. So if you need an opener on a budget, the Genie 1035-V (also known as the Genie Chain Drive 500) gives you that desirable low price point. It doesn't have a lot of high-end tech features, nor will it manage heavy garage doors, but it does the basic work of raising and lowering the garage door perfectly well.
You'll never ask yourself that question again. Just look at your phone to know for sure. Most smart garage door openers will tell you if it's open or shut. They'll send a message every time your garage door is opened or closed too, if you like. Electric garage door openers provide a huge amount of convenience and safety. Imagine you're in a hurry, it's raining out, you pull out of the garage then press the button on your garage door opener remote. The garage door closes, and you didn't have to get out of your car.
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