Because your garage door can be customized, pricing varies. Our Clopay configurator will help you review pricing as you begin your project. You’ll start with your door size and whether you need a single or double car door. Next, you can choose the collection of door, which gives you options of various materials and styles. Then, you’ll choose your construction, which allows you to decide what you need in terms of energy efficiency, durability and noise control. Lastly, you will be able to visualize the design and see an end price. Other optional add-ons include windows, decorative hardware, smart features and the r-value. However, you do not have to use the configurator. We also install standard garage doors that have not been customized so you know the product price early on in the process.
The German-made, .75-horsepower (equivalent) Direct Drive 1042V004 garage door opener doesn't use a belt drive or a chain drive. Instead, the mobile motor crawls along a stationary chain, making it exceptionally quiet. This garage door opener is also feature-packed, though the wireless entry keypad is an extra-cost accessory. Reliability is excellent, and installation is at least a little easier than some other garage door openers. This opener is also sold under the Sommer brand and with different model numbers, but all are similar.
In the market for overhead garage doors? Browse our selection of Pella garage doors. You'll find many options for single garage doors, double garage doors, insulated garage doors and even roll up garage doors. Lowe’s also carries garage door screens—great for those who love to spend hours in the garage, but don’t want to deal with the bugs and pests that invite themselves in. We also carry garage door hardware, garage door springs, garage door decorative hardware and garage door sensors, and don’t forget to ask about our garage door installation and garage door opener installation. Once you've decided a garage door fits your home, you'll need to find the garage door opener that works best for you. At Lowe’s, we carry Genie garage door openers, Chamberlain garage door openers and SOMMER garage door openers that will work seamlessly with your garage doors. We now offer a garage door opener that's compatible with your Iris home automation system, too. Whether you prefer opening your garage with a garage door remote or garage door keypad, you'll find it at Lowe’s. Our selection of garage remotes includes everything from universal garage door remotes to specific brands like Chamberlain garage door opener remotes and Chamberlain garage door keypads. We also carry backup batteries, nylon garage door rollers, garage door parts, garage door opener parts and rail extensions to make sure your garage door is in good working order. Plus, we even offer garage door installations services, which include garage door spring repair and replacements, and garage door cable repair and replacements. We can also replace your garage door weather seal, also known as garage door threshold seals, and install a new garage door opener battery.
Torsion springs are devices that lift most of the weight of a garage door so that the door can be opened manually or by an electric opener. The torsion principle is applied via an efficient and economical apparatus consisting of a torsion shaft under spring torsion, which turns lift drums, which wind cables attached to the door near the bottom. All of this apparatus is mounted over the top of the door. The energy stored is sufficient, in an uncontrolled release, to break things, hurt you, or perhaps even kill you. The same could be said of jacking up your car to change a tire, or mowing your lawn, or raising children, so it is not crazy to want to do this yourself.
Even if one could somehow stretch and clamp the springs to the proper extra length, the process would still be more trouble, and there would be little or no reduction of risk. Lifting the full weight of the unsprung door by hand and clamping it in the raised position is dangerous in itself, and creates the same amount of stored energy as winding the springs, ready to slip out of your hands. Many doors won't travel far enough up the track to provide clearance to access the springs. You're also going to have to deal with winding stiff steel cables onto both lift drums at once without any resistance to maintain tension. Finally, even if you managed to complete the installation with the door raised, you then have to lower the massive door against an untested balancing torque. If you've made a mistake, then that massive door has nothing but your skeletal force applied through your meat clamps (hands) to prevent it from falling down and crushing whatever is in the way (perhaps your feet?).
Tools in Action says the Ryobi Ultra Quiet has plenty of versatility, as you can plug devices into the opener hardware, like a Bluetooth speaker, a fan, or even an 18V Ryobi cordless tool battery. When the opener has power, it will charge the battery. But if your home ever loses power, the 18V battery works as a backup to the garage door opener, allowing it to operate normally.
Leveling the door: Before commencing the spring winding, to check that you have the door properly leveled on the cables, considering all the factors above that make this a tricky adjustment, apply the winding cone setscrew lightly to lock the (unwound) spring cone temporarily on the torsion shaft, and momentarily lift the door slightly off the floor. Adjust the drum set as needed to level the door, repeating this slight lift test. Loosen the cone setscrew before winding the spring(s).
Prices, like the garage doors themselves, run the gamut. You can pay as little as $400 for a door that you install yourself, or several thousand dollars for a high-end premium door that includes all the bells and whistles, including installation. A mid-range, 16-by-7-foot door will typically cost from $750 to $1,500, installed. Premium insulated steel doors run from $750 to $3,500. According to Remodeling Magazine’s 2017 Cost vs. Value report, the average national cost of a garage door replacement is $3,304.
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Critical measurements: Torsion springs come a variety of standardized sizes, so you have to carefully measure the old springs to know what to order for proper replacements. Tables of standard sizes and designs are on the Web, such as here [www.industrialspring.com]. The four critical measurements (all in inches) are: (1) the wire thickness (which I'm measuring here with a dial caliper; you can also measure the length of a number of closely stacked turns with a ruler and divide by the number of turns in the stack, measuring 10 turns this way makes the math easy), (2) the inside diameter (not outside!) of the relaxed (not wound!) coil, (3) the overall length of the relaxed (not wound!) spring coils, not including the winding cones, and (4) the right- or left-hand winding of the spring. One must glibly quote those figures to the spring supplier, otherwise one's lack of expertise will be obvious, and one will not be worthy of buying the parts.
In my case, removing and replacing the relaxed springs required that I take down the assembly: torsion shaft, lift drums, and bearings. Doing that requires unbolting the center bearing plate from the wall, removing the drums from the shaft, and finally sliding the shaft back and forth out of the end bearings to remove the whole assembly off the wall. I am fortunate to have a lot of clearance in this garage to make the disassembly simpler. Tighter clearance to walls or ceiling would make disassembly a more difficult manipulation.
Stress and lifetime: Calculating the maximal stress in the wire is useful for estimating the lifetime. Using the formula above, the bending stress S in the spring wire is 32*238/(π*0.2253^3) = 212 Kpsi. The spring index C is D/d = 2.23 / 0.225 = 9.88. The Wahl correction factor is Kw = (4C-1)/(4C-4) + 0.615/C = 1.15. The Wahl-corrected stress is Kw * S = 1.15 * 212 Kpsi = 244 Kpsi. This predicts about a 10,000-cycle lifetime, which is the standard "cheap spring" configuration originally installed. Note that while this stress is proportional to the torque being applied, it is also in proportion to the inverse third-power of the wire size. Thus slightly heavier wire sizes (and suitably adjusted D and/or L) radically improve the expected cycle lifetime of the spring.
If you've researched this subject at all, you will no doubt have heard that you shouldn't be attempting torsion spring replacement as a do-it-yourselfer. That is generally good advice, so if you have any doubts about your abilities to do risky physical work on your own, hire the job out like everyone else. I found I was capable of doing this work with acceptable risk, because I intelligently understood the techniques, paid careful attention to methods and safety, knew how to use common tools in good condition, properly improvised the special tools I didn't have, and diligently attended to correctly performing a few moments of hazardous manipulation. I learned to do it purely on my own based mostly on bits of advice reluctantly given in Internet forums such as the Usenet newsgroup alt.home.repair. When I first wrote this page in 2002, there was no other do-it-yourself information available on the Web, and it was not until 2005 that reliable information disclosing the techniques started to appear elsewhere (see links below).
Our technicians are specially trained to handle a variety of garage brands, styles, and configurations. After arriving at your home, a Sears technician will diagnose the problem and walk you through the options for fixing it. Next, the technician will make any necessary adjustments or replace broken parts to ensure the door can be operational once again. We always attempt to complete repairs the same day of service, and your satisfaction is guaranteed. Our representatives are standing by for your call and are happy discuss pricing options.
Lift cable placement: On the standard residential door mechanism, the loops at the lower ends of the two lift cables loop over the two bottom roller shafts which project from the bottom bracket on the door. The upper cable ends fasten to the drums using one of the methods described above. The drums are positioned along the torsion shaft such that the inner edge of each drum is approximately over the edge of the door. The cable winds onto the drum from outside in, so at the top of travel the cable is winding onto the inner edge of the drum, vertical from the edge of the door where it is looped over the roller shaft. As the door is lowered, the cable winds out to the outer edge of the drum, and thus is a bit out from the vertical, but the cable still falls in the gap between the guide rails and door edge. My cables rub and slap on the rails a bit, but after 30 years and many 10,000s of cycles, they don't seem to have worn at all.
If the spring is broken near a winding cone, you might think you can remove and discard the short broken piece of spring from the cone, clean up the end of the long remaining spring, and insert that end into the cone. This is another extrememly risky improvisation. The shortened spring is not going to have the correct weight-bearing characteristics for the door, so you will not be able to balance the door properly. The shortened spring will be proportionately overwound, resulting in extra stress that will increase the expectation of another fracture. And the aging and history of the original spring being broken greatly increases the likelihood of another fracture at other locations.
In the photo, you can see an extra lag screw on the bottom of the plate, reinforcing weak anchoring from the original two screws (hidden behind the springs). This extra screw was applied by a professional garage door technician on a previous repair visit. I have since replaced the backing with a sound plywood panel anchored into the concrete door header. Since these bolts clamp all the opposing torsion to the wall, the attachment must be sturdy.

If return on investment is a priority and you don’t live in the West, your best strategy may be to buy a low- to moderately-priced door that significantly improves the look of your home. Consider adding an automatic garage door opener at the same time. The beauty of a new door and the convenience of an automatic opener are sure to be a winning combination.

Another recent innovation in the garage door opener is a fingerprint-based wireless keypad. This unit attaches to the outside of the garage door on the jamb and allows users to open and close their doors with the press of a finger, rather than creating a personal identification number (PIN). This is especially helpful for families with children who may forget a code and are latchkey kids.


Powerful, quiet and durable, Overhead Door® automatic garage door openers are designed for performance. And when you combine an Overhead Door® opener with one of our doors, you get an integrated system that maximizes performance and reliability. Our full line of automatic openers features a variety of power levels and specifications to handle different garage door weights and sizes. Each opener also comes with built-in, standard functions for the ultimate in safety, convenience and power. Don't know which opener to choose? Find the answers to some common questions to make sure you're buying the right garage door opener​. We offer a wide variety of additional garage door opener accessories.​​​
The inside of the door panels bear a few dings, since filled with Bondo, from my teenage boys shooting hockey pucks. The streaks on the right that look like dinosaur claw scratches came from operating the door inadvertently when the rear doors of a van were open. The responsibility for these scars is all mine; they have also been Bondo-filled. We tend to use a lot of Bondo around our house. The crud on the walls and ceiling are cobwebs and dust infiltrates.
Another moment of truth arrives as the winding-up of the springs begins. (I am just posing here with the camera held out in my left hand. Except for lifting the door onto the scale, this was a one-man job, including the photography.) The position of the bars in this photo was necessary to take the photo, and does not show a correct winding technique, You should not have to swing the bar up as high over the top as shown. The lower bar during winding should swing from pointing down to pointing a little past horizontal. Then you hold that bar horizontal while socketing the other bar pointing down, apply force to that (now) lower bar, then remove the (now) upper bar, wind one-quarter turn, and repeat.
Overhead Door® openers​ and garage doors are built with longevity in-mind. By performing a few routine tasks, you can help ensure your garage door system stays safe and stands the test of time. One important part of garage door system routine maintenance is to make sure the photo-eyes have not gone out of alignment. The photo-eyes are the infrared sensors which monitor whether the space at the bottom of your garage door is clear. When these sensors are not lined up properly they will keep your door from closing. Make sure to occasionally check your photo-eyes’ alignment to ensure they are correctly detecting obstructions to keep your garage door safe and operating properly.
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