The technician, Robert Helton, was very pleasant, helpful, and professional. He repaired the garage door opener expeditiously and explained why it hadn't worked properly. He also checked the chain mechanism and the door itself and showed me how to manually work the door should I need to do that in the future. I was very pleased with this repair work.
The second stage of the wireless garage door opener system solved the opening-the-neighbor's-garage-door problem. The remote controls on these systems transmitted a digital code, and the receiver in the garage responded only to that code. The codes were typically set by eight to twelve DIP switches on the receiver and transmitter, so they allowed for 28 = 256 to 212 = 4,096 different codes. As long as neighbors used different codes, they would not open each other's garage doors. The intent of these systems was to avoid interference with nearby garage doors; the systems were not designed with security in mind. Intruders were able to defeat the security of these systems and gain entry to the garage and the house. The number of codes was small enough that even an unsophisticated intruder with a compatible remote control transmitter could just start transmitting all possible codes until he found one that opened the door. More sophisticated intruders could acquire a black box master key that automatically transmitted every possible code in a short time. An even more sophisticated method is known as a replay attack. The attacker would use a code grabber, which has a receiver that captures the remote's digital code and can retransmit that digital code at a later time. The attacker with a code grabber would wait nearby for the homeowner to use his remote, capture the code, and then replay the code to open the door when the homeowner was gone. Multicode openers became unpopular in areas where security was important, but due to their ease of programming, such openers are often used to operate such things as the gates in gated apartment complexes.
GUESS YOU DON’T CARE to reply to my emails, so I'm posting it up here..... On Sep 8, 2018, at 2:52 PM, Joe Turiczek wrote: Thanks for the invoice, thanks for the service, thanks for the rapid response, thanks for Chris (the tech), but one note….. I’m a really handy guy, I repair and maintain nearly everything around the house, I am very mechanically adept, and I am also a highly skilled technical person that runs my own business by trade. I would have and could have repaired the belt myself, but I am traveling for business sooner than I could have ordered a belt, and did the repair….which means, I looked at the belts, I watched all the videos, it’s an EASY repair. I have belts down to a science, I’m really not an armchair DIY repair guy, I’m pretty good……That being said, I also shopped for prices of new belts for at least 30 mins or better, across easily 20-30 different parts and/or repair websites. Why am I telling you this? Because I think Chris, and your labor prices are spot on, and he deserved every cent, and your labor billing is more than fair…..however, I think your charge for the belt is a bunch of crap, it is nearly double of the HIGHEST price I found, which was $20-$25 higher than the average prices I found. Based on that alone, there is no way I could recommend, your otherwise FANTASTIC service, to anybody I know with a straight face. That’s just me being honest, because that’s who I am.
The "safety issue" trick: Another tip-off is the use of language like "safety issue". This is meant to trump any objections you might have to a costly repair bill. Don't be manipulated by the suggestion that you are risking disaster if you don't buy something expensive. Even if you think the risk is genuine, get another estimate, and tell the second repairman you are skeptical; every technician loves to prove the competition made a mistake.

Yet another professional wrote me to say that the red paint on certain components of these assemblies is an "industry standard" that signals, "Danger! Part under hazardous tension." Other items under tension like the bolts on the cable attachment plate on the door should therefore also be painted red. If so, then this is a new, ambiguous, unreliable, and little-publicized standard, because none of my old hardware shows it, red paint also means other things, and searching the Web does not readily turn up references to this practice.
And for some extra features, you'll appreciate accessing the system through the MyQ smartphone app. You can set up this Chamberlain opener to automatically close the door after 1, 5, or 10 minutes, which is great for people who are a bit forgetful. We also really like the motion-detecting control panel, which turns on lights whenever it records nearby movement.

Garage Door Repair

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